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Full Schedule

Full Schedule

  • Saturday, May 1, 2021
  • 7:00 AM – 8:00 AM US CT
    Diagnosing Alport Syndrome in Pediatric Patients and Extended Family Members

    Presenter: Kenneth Lieberman, MD – Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine

    Presenter: Prasad Devarajan, MD – University of Cincinnati

  • 9:00 AM – 11:00 AM US CT
    AAP Presidential Plenary

    Moderator: Mark Del Monte, JD

    Cross-Disciplinary Pathway

  • 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM US CT
    An Update on Cutting Edge Critical Care Nephrology

    Chair: David Selewski, MD, MS – Medical University of South Carolina

    Chair: Shina Menon, MD – University of Washington, Seattle Children's Hospital

    This critical care nephrology session will focus on a potpourri of current topics with a focus on incorporating these practices and techniques into clinical care.

    Nephrology

    Critical Care

  • 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM US CT
    Current Progress on Pathogenesis and Etiology of Kawasaki Disease

    Chair: Mark Hicar, MD, PhD – University at Buffalo

    Current research efforts focused on the lates knowledge of possible etiologies and methods of diagnosis will be discussed.

    Infectious Diseases

    Basic Science Pathway

    Cardiology

    Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology

  • 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM US CT
    Hospitalists Scope of Practice: What They Do and What They Shouldn't Do (and What They Are Doing During COVID-19)

    Chair: Daniel A. Rauch, MD – Tufts Children's Hospital

    In November 2019 the first PHM certification exam was administered, minting the first group of ABP certified Pediatric Hospitalists. Much is known about the current clinical roles served by hospitalists. However, the scope of clinical practice varies tremendously from general inpatient pediatric floor care to the intensive care units (neonatal and pediatric), newborn nursery, subspecialty inpatient care, surgical co-management, delivery room, sedation, complex care, and the emergency department. Prior to formal recognition of PHM by the ABP, the term hospitalist seemed to apply to everyone who worked in a hospital who did not have another certification beyond general pediatrics. The purpose of this session is to discuss the current scope of PHM practice and where, if at all, the edges of that practice should be. Absent delineation of scope and as several pediatric subspecialties workforce and trainees numbers decline, pediatric hospitalists have been and maybe further pushed into filling those gaps. Pediatric hospitalists have been at the forefront in providing value based care and have taken the lead in many quality improvement initiatives at hospitals around the country. These qualities and more make pediatric hospitalists a valued commodity as they fill these varied roles within the hospital. The presenters represent division leaders of groups with broad scopes of practice, a community hospitalist who covers the DR to ER, and the co-chair of the AAP Section on Hospital Medicine Neonatal Hospitalists sub-committee. Additionally all presenters can comment on even wider expansion of practice during the COVID surge. Updated

    Well Newborn

    COVID-19

    Hospital-based Medicine

    Community Pediatrics

    General Pediatrics

    Emergency Medicine

  • 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM US CT
    Newborn Microbiome, Perinatal Antibiotics, and Childhood Health

    Chair: Heather H. Burris, MD, MPH – Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennyslvania

    Chair: Sagori Mukhopadhyay, MD, MMSc – Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, University of Philadelphia

    Maternal microbiota at the time of delivery has a multi-faceted role in determining the neonatal outcome: it may be a driver in the premature onset of labor, it may lead to life-threatening infection of the fetus/newborn and, in the vast majority of pregnancies, it will provide the pioneer colonizers for the newborn’s microbiome. This early microbiome plays an active part in interacting with the neonatal immune system and establishing the path for future health outcomes. While interventions that alter maternal microbiota such as perinatal antibiotics have significantly reduced adverse outcomes for mothers and neonates, this health gain has required widespread use. Half of women delivering in United States will be administered antibiotics prior to delivery either as surgical prophylaxis or for prevention of neonatal infection from pathogens such as group B streptococcus. What, if any, are the unintended consequences of interrupting the mother to child microbiota transmission? This Hot topic symposia will discuss determinants of neonatal microbiome, specifically, maternal microbiome in pregnancy and effect of perinatal antibiotics, and review the evidence for association of early life antibiotics with altered microbiota and adverse health outcomes. We will end with a discussion on emerging thoughts on alternate solutions and mitigation of potential risks

    Well Newborn

    Neonatology

    Infectious Diseases

    Epidemiology & Health Services Pathway

    Basic Science Pathway

    Cross-Disciplinary Pathway

  • 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM US CT
    Therapeutic Advances Against Mendelian Disorders in Children

    Chair: Pankaj Agrawal, MD, MMSC – Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School

    Over 30 million patients in the US live with a rare disease; 80% of them have an underlying genetic cause and a majority affect children. Exome/Genome sequencing is helping accelerate the diagnosis of these patients, although many cases remain undiagnosed despite these technologies. The Undiagnosed Disease Network (UDN), The Manton Center for Orphan Disease Research and several other centers are dedicated to helping those patients reach a diagnosis. Sadly, treatment options are nonexistent most of those patients, and the rarity of their conditions leaves many individuals effectively orphaned. New and creative tools and frameworks will be necessary to address these challenges. The approaches may include antisense oligonucleotides (ASO)/siRNAs, gene therapy, and CRISPR-CAS9 based gene editing. The therapeutic promise of ASOs has been seen especially in the CNS with the remarkable success of nusinersen for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) as well as promising early phase investigations of oligonucleotides for ALS and Huntington’s Disease. We have recently shown that it is possible to effectively deploy a custom-designed ASO in less than a year for an eight-year-old girl with CLN7-related Batten disease, a rare, fatal disorder of neuronal lysosomal storage. Similarly, the recent approval of zolgensma in SMA has shown the potential of gene therapy in the near future. Hundreds of clinical trials are currently ongoing to use gene therapy approach in rare diseases. Lastly, the promise of CRISPR-based therapies where gene editing can fix the defect in the gene itself is rapidly progressing with many ongoing clinical trials.

    Genomics

    Digital Therapeutics Pathway

  • 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM US CT
    Therapeutic Drift in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: Practice Without Evidence

    Chair: Ju Lee Oei, MBBS FRACP MD – Royal Hospital for Women

    Chair: Richard Martin, MD – Case Western

    No area of medicine has had as much success as newborn care. Fifty years ago, more than 75% of preterm infants died soon after birth. Those that survived were left with serious complications. Now, more than 75% of preterm infants survive, including those at the limits of viability. Such astounding achievements would not have been possible without research and the rapid implementation of research findings into clinical practice. Indeed, neonatal care is now one of the most active and cost-effective fields of research in medicine.

    However, therapeutic drift has crept into many areas of our practice. Based on incomplete or little substantive evidence, our current treatment of sick infants and their mothers may actually do more harm than good and there are multiple areas where equipoise has been lost, which obstructs future research and evaluation of these missing pieces of information.

    In this session, we look at some of the most important practices in neonatology that are now almost universally accepted despite little evidence of benefit or harm. Collectively, the topics discussed in this session have the potential to affect every single birth in the world (>130 million each year), including ~15 million of the sickest infants affected by prematurity and hypoxia, the two single most important causes of infant mortality and disability in the world.

    Specifically, our speakers will address:
    Antenatal steroids: used to promote lung maturation, steroids are now given to even early term infants and sometimes, in repeated doses with questionable benefit and possible harm to neurodevelopment.
    Delayed Cord Clamping (DCC) is routinely used in extremely preterm infants to promote cardiovascular stabilization thereby aiming to reduce brain injury and mortality. DCC is routinely practiced in more mature infants as well as healthy term infants with potential adverse sequelae including hyperviscosity and jaundice.
    Oxygen for newborn resuscitation. Studies on hypoxic full-term infants demonstrated significantly decreased mortality when the infants were resuscitated with air compared to pure oxygen. Over the years, clinicians have moved towards using lower oxygen strategies based on these studies and others which demonstrated oxidative stress and injury with high oxygen administration. Whether lower oxygen strategies are sufficient to prevent hypoxia, especially in preterm infants with lung immaturity is uncertain.
    Apnoea affects almost every premature infant. It can be successfully treated with respiratory support and caffeine. However, there remains significant variability in the timing of discontinuation of caffeine, and convalescent preterm infants continue to have episodes of intermittent hypoxemia beyond the postmenstrual age when most clinicians stop caffeine therapy. Apnoea and intermittent hypoxemia is associated with poor neurodevelopmental outcomes but conversely, monitoring and prolonging supports like caffeine and oxygen supplementation beyond what the infant requires can do more harm than good, as well as being extremely costly.
    Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) at 33.5◦C for 72 hours is the only proven therapy that reduces the risk of death or disability in infants with moderate or severe encephalopathy . Today, there is an increased use of TH in infants with mild encephalopathy, following cardiac arrest and other indications that do not reflect evidence from robust randomised controlled studies.

    Neonatology

    Clinical Research Pathway

  • 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM US CT
    Breastfeeding/Human Milk

    Moderator: Margaret Parker, MD, MPH – Boston Medical Center

    Moderator: Laura Kair, MD, MAS – University of California Davis School of Medicine

    Well Newborn

    COVID-19

    Breastfeeding/Human Milk

    Obesity

    Neonatology

    General Pediatrics

    Gastroenterology/Hepatology

  • 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM US CT
    Global Neonatal & Children's Health I

    Moderator: Somashekhar M. Nimbalkar, MD – Pramukhswami Medical College

    Moderator: Renate Savich, MD – University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center

    Global Neonatal & Children's Health

  • 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM US CT
    Historical Perspectives

    Moderator: Bishara J. Freij, MD – Beaumont Children's Hospital

    Moderator: Jan M. Goplerud, MD – St Christopher's Hospital for Children/ Drexel University College of Medicine

  • 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM US CT
    Medical Education: Diversity/Inclusion/Equity and Burnout/Wellness

    Moderator: Jon McGreevy, MD, MSPH – Phoenix Children's Hospital

    Moderator: Rita Nathawad, MD, MS-GHP – University of Florida

    Adolescent Medicine

    COVID-19

    Pulmonology

    Neonatology

    Infectious Diseases

    Hospital-based Medicine

    Education Pathway

    Diversity and Inclusion

    Community Pediatrics

    Pediatric Nutrition

    Neurology

    Nephrology

    Health Equity/Social Determinants of Health

    General Pediatrics

    Gastroenterology/Hepatology

    Endocrinology

    Emergency Medicine

    Critical Care

    Child Abuse & Neglect

    Cardiology

    Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology

  • 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM US CT
    Neonatal Neurology: Clinical: Preterm

    Moderator: Ann L Anderson Berry, MD, PhD – University of Nebraska Medical Center

    Moderator: Vinay Sharma, MD FAAP – Hennepin Healthcare

    Neurology

    Neonatology

  • 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM US CT
    Quality Improvement/Patient Safety: Ambulatory and Urgent Care QI

    Moderator: Alex R. Kemper, MD, MPH, MS – Nationwide Children's Hospital

    Moderator: Megan Tschudy, MD, MPH – Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

    General Pediatrics

    Quality Improvement/Patient Safety

  • 11:00 AM – 11:30 AM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital's Anna Maria Hibbs, MD
  • 11:00 AM – 11:30 AM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital's Cynthia Bearer, MD, PhD
  • 11:00 AM – 11:30 AM US CT
    Trainee Zone Networking: Jay Mehta, MD, MS - The Joys of a Career in Pediatric Rheumatology | Presented by CARRA

    Presenter: Jay Mehta – University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

  • 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: C.S. Mott Children's Hospital, University of Michigan Health's David Kershaw, M.D.
  • 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: C.S. Mott Children's Hospital, University of Michigan Health's Georgina Koch
  • 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: C.S. Mott Children's Hospital, University of Michigan Health's John Barks, M.D.
  • 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Children's Wisconsin/Medical College of Wisconsin's Vanessa McFadden, MD, PhD
  • 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital's Anna Maria Hibbs, MD
  • 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital's Cynthia Bearer, MD, PhD
  • 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: University of Rochester/Golisano Children's Hospital's Kate Ackerman, MD
  • 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: University of Rochester/Golisano Children's Hospital's Lauren Solan, MD, MEd
  • 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Vanderbilt University Medical Center Department of Pediatrics' Kris Rehm, MD, MMHC, SFHM
  • 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Vanderbilt University Medical Center Department of Pediatrics' Kristen Noble, MD, PhD
  • 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM US CT
    AAP Presidential Plenary: Equity - Emerging Pediatric Research on Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion

    Moderator: Nia J. Heard-Garris, MD, MSc, FAAP

    This AAP session will feature highly ranked 2021 PAS abstracts plus the Silverman Lecture

    Cross-Disciplinary Pathway

  • 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM US CT
    Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia-Associated Pulmonary Hypertension: Novel Mechanisms and Approaches for Disease Prevention and Treatment

    Chair: Binoy Shivanna, MD, DM, PhD – Baylor College of Medicine

    Chair: Karen C. Young, MD – University Of Miami Miller School Of Medicine

    Chair: Steven Abman, MD – University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Center

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a developmental lung disorder of preterm infants primarily caused by immature host defense mechanisms that prevent tissue injury and facilitate repair. This disorder is the most common complication of premature birth, and its incidence remains unchanged over the past few decades. Additionally, BPD increases long-term cardiopulmonary and neurodevelopmental morbidities of preterm infants. Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a common morbidity of BPD. The pooled prevalence of PH in mild, moderate, and severe BPD is 6%, 12%, and 39%, respectively. Importantly, the presence of PH increases both short- and long-term morbidities and mortality in BPD infants. Further, there are no curative therapies for this disease complex. Not surprisingly, BPD is the second most expensive childhood disease after asthma. Thus, the need of the hour is to understand the pathogenic mechanisms of BPD-associated PH (BPD-PH) and develop meaningful strategies to prevent and treat this devastating disease of preterm infants. This symposium is designed to fulfill this timely need. Dr. Abman will begin the session by presenting the overview and impact of this symposium on the cardiopulmonary health of preterm infants. Dr. Shivanna will then emphasize the importance of rigor and transparency in phenotyping experimental BPD-PH, discuss the need for several models of this disease complex to avoid a “one-size-fits-all” approach, and build a case for endotype- and phenotype-targeted clinical trials. Later on, Dr. Abman, Dr. Ambalavanan, Dr. Young, Dr. Bhandari, and Dr. Wedgwood will present the new and novel pathogenic mechanisms of BPD-PH learned from the state-of-art animal studies. A primary emphasis of all the panelists will be on how this new knowledge can be translated from bench to bedside to impact the well-being of infants with this disease. Finally, the symposium participants will be allowed sufficient time to have a robust discussion with the panelists about the roadblocks to the clinical translation, directions of future research, and opportunities for collaboration.

    Pulmonology

    Neonatology

    Developmental Biology

    Children with Chronic Conditions

    Basic Science Pathway

    Cross-Disciplinary Pathway

    Cardiology

    Academic and Research Skills

  • 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM US CT
    Building a Critical Bridge Between Pediatrics and Early Education During the Time of COVID-19 and Beyond

    Chair: Anda Kuo, MD – UCSF

    Chair: Lisa Chamberlain, MD, MPH – Stanford University

    School readiness has impact on academic, health and economic outcomes across a child’s lifespan. The pandemic undermines traditional health and early education settings and threatens to worsen child outcomes. In face of a rapidly changing landscape to deliver care to young children and their families, unique collaborations between pediatrics and education are driving innovative solutions that will have impact beyond the pandemic.

    Early childhood is a critical period of brain and socio-emotional development for establishing a strong foundation for learning and is highly vulnerable during this disruptive, traumatic time. Children living in poverty and in communities of color are burdened with the greatest educational disparities compounded by the multi-pronged impacts of the pandemic. Child health providers have unparalleled, systematic access to children ages zero to five years with multiple touchpoints a year. In particular, child health providers may serve as the most consistent service sector for young children living in poverty, especially during the pandemic. Early child educators have a wealth of expertise and innovation in preparing young minds for a lifetime of learning. Unfortunately, the fields of early childhood education (ECE) and child health largely work in parallel to support the development of children ages 0-5. The pandemic highlights the powerful impact of bridging these fields to transform outcomes for children who face disparities in educational readiness and achievement. How might pediatrics best partner with ECE to eliminate disparities in kindergarten readiness? What innovations in early education can bridge child health and ECE? How might philanthropy drive momentum to harness child health and ECE? What lessons have we gained during the pandemic about collaboration and innovations across our fields? In this session we bring together thought leaders from across disciplines to spark creative solutions and partnerships that will support early minds to be ready to learn during and beyond COVID-19.

    Social Media & Technology

    Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics

    Community Pediatrics

    School and Community Health

    Literacy

    Health Equity/Social Determinants of Health

    Cross-Disciplinary Pathway

    Advocacy Pathway

  • 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM US CT
    Flipping the Script on Emergency Care of Children With Medical Complexity: Challenges & Opportunities

    Chair: Christian D. Pulcini, MD, MEd, MPH – University of Vermont Medical Center and Children’s Hospital

    The panel discussion will feature an interdisciplinary group of pediatricians including a general pediatrician, pediatric complex care hospitalist, pediatric emergency medicine physician, and pediatric pulmonologist to discuss the challenges faced in caring for the emergent needs of children with medical complexity across all medical settings. Children with medical complexity represent a medically and socially vulnerable group of children who require extraordinary resources to address their emergent needs. As such, collaboration and innovation across disciplines in pediatrics is essential to address the inherent challenges. The panel will briefly discuss current challenges, research, and initiatives designed to improve urgent and emergency care of children with medical complexity. As experts in the field, they will then discuss opportunities for improvement, including proposed innovative solutions that are yet to be implemented and tested. The session then will be opened for questions from the audience.

    Hospital-based Medicine

    Children with Chronic Conditions

    Emergency Medicine

    Cross-Disciplinary Pathway

  • 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM US CT
    Hormonal Therapy for Neonatal Brain Injury: Recent Advances and Limitations

    Chair: PRAVEEN BALLABH, MD – Children Hospital at Montefiore

    Chair: Terrie Inder, MBChB, MD – Brigham and Women's Hospital

    Hormones are powerful modulators of cell lineage and differentiation. Whereas appropriate exposure can serve as an accelerant to mature organ function in the human fetus and premature infant, they can harm if used inappropriately. Prenatal glucocorticoids differentiate epithelial cell functions of the lung, skin, gut, kidney, eye and CNS and thereby help ensure normal ex utero multiorgan adaptive capacity. While absence of glucocorticoid signals can be detrimental, excessive exposure can induce injury such as brain and hippocampal atrophy. The ubiquitous organ level effects of thyroxine during development are well established and its robust role in brain development is absolute. Yet, animal results did not always translate successfully into effective thyroxine interventions in clinical trials (THOP trial NS045109-01). Although, beneficial results of thyroxine are encouraging in animal models of neonatal brain ischemia and hemorrhage, no neonatal clinical trials exist. The promise of high does erythropoietin on improving neurologic outcomes was unfulfilled (PENUT Trial (NS077953). Estrogen therapy reverses the lost maternal in utero hormonal exposure as evident by its role in neuroprotection during hypoxia. Might these well-defined animal models someday contribute to improving neurodevelopmental outcome of premature infants? This symposium will highlight recent advances from basic, translational, and clinical research to provide a comprehensive update on the risks and benefits of hormonal therapy in premature infants at risk for hypoxia and neurological delays.

    Neonatology

  • 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM US CT
    Leveraging the Power of Relationships to Advance Workforce Diversity in Academic Pediatrics: Mentorship, Sponsorship, and Coaching

    Chair: Jean Raphael, MD, MPH – Baylor College of Medicine

    Despite large-scale initiatives to promote workforce diversity in academic pediatrics, the current state of underrepresented in medicine (URiM) reflects marginal improvements in some areas and clear regression in others. The proportion of URiM faculty in US academic institutions has essentially remained flat over the past two decades while the number of African-American males in medical school is presently lower than it was in 1978. These data demonstrate that workforce diversity in medicine is not only stagnating but failing to keep pace with population trends toward a more diverse country. For URiM who do pursue a career in academic pediatrics, they must overcome the “diversity tax”, defined as the burden of extra responsibilities placed on URiM faculty to achieve diversity. Guidance from, and relationships with, senior leadership have been promoted as evidence-based strategies to foster URiM professional development and scholarly advancement. Historically, efforts have primarily focused on mentorship. However sponsorship and coaching also offer powerful relationships that can be leveraged to support URiM. This Hot Topics session will begin with a brief overview of diversity trends in academic pediatrics and differentiation of mentorship, sponsorship, and coaching. Subsequent presentations will focus on the ideal characteristics of junior and senior individuals in each of these relationships. We will conclude with discussion of the roles and responsibilities of academic leadership in developing best practices and outcome measures for career advancement of URiM.

    Hospital-based Medicine

    Diversity and Inclusion

    Leadership and Business Training

    Emergency Medicine

    Career Development Pathway

  • 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM US CT
    Management of CAKUT: From Genetics to Optimizing Nephron Function

    Chair: Keri Drake, MD – The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center

    Chair: Jacqueline Ho, MD, MS – UPMC Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh

    This video is unavailable at the request of one or more presenters.
    This session will review clinical, translational and basic science advances in development nephrology and urology. It will identify current and future methods to optimize kidney outcomes.

    Neonatology

    Genomics

    Developmental Biology

    Children with Chronic Conditions

    Basic Science Pathway

    Nephrology

    General Pediatrics

  • 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM US CT
    Individualized Neonatal Care: Sex-Specific Approach Matters!

    Chair: Pradeep Alur, MD – University of Mississippi Medical center

    The biological differences between the sexes manifest quite early during fetal life. The crown-rump length is larger in male fetuses compared to females in the first trimester. Placentae of male and female fetuses have different protein and gene expressions, especially in adverse conditions. Even within the intrauterine milieu, the same extracellular micro RNA may show upregulation in females and downregulation in male fetuses. There appears to be a natural survival advantage for females. Maternal glucocorticoids (GC) play a key role in fetal growth and organ maturation. However, excess glucocorticoids can not only affect growth, but the response may be sex-specific and probably mediated through glucocorticoid receptors (GR) in the placenta. Mild pre-eclampsia and asthma are associated with normal growth patterns in males, but in female fetuses, they are associated with a slowing of growth rate without causing IUGR, probably as an adaptive response for future adverse events. Thus, female fetuses survive while male fetuses exhibit IUGR, preterm delivery, and even death in the face of another adverse event.
    There is growing evidence that maternal pre-pregnancy overweight or obesity status is directly associated with a higher risk of obesity in a male child, but not in a female child, at one year of age. It is fascinating that male and female fetuses respond differently to the same intrauterine environment, and this suggests a fundamental biological variation most likely at the cellular and molecular level.
    It is well-known that weight, length, and head circumferences are greater in male preterm infants at all gestational ages. We have sex-specific growth charts such as Fenton-2013 for the preterm infants starting from 22 weeks of gestation. It is intuitive to wonder if growth rates are different between male and female ELBW infants, then their nutritional requirements would also be different. There is some preliminary clinical evidence suggesting the same. Poindexter et al., in their “early vs. late amino acid initiation study,” noted that males in the late amino acid administration group had increased odds of having a suboptimal head circumference at 18 months corrected gestational age.
    There are sex-specific differences in the outcomes associated with birth asphyxia. Males have poorer neurodevelopmental outcomes for a similar degree of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Pharmacologic studies in a traumatic brain injury piglet model have shown striking differences between males and females. A subset analysis of the multicenter randomized controlled trial in extremely low-birth-weight infants found that the prophylactic use of indomethacin prophylaxis slightly favored males regarding the development of severe IVH (grades III and IV) and on long-term outcomes.
    Yet, many large perinatal studies have not explored if there were any sex-specific differences in the outcomes. Caffeine for Apnea of Prematurity trial showed gross motor functions were not different in those exposed to caffeine versus controls. Though animal studies have shown that neonatal caffeine exposure has sex-specific benefits; However, as the sex-specific analysis is not performed, any specific sex-related benefits of therapy may have been masked.
    We, therefore, believe that bringing awareness about sex-specific analysis of the data in all the neonatal studies may help us all understand the therapeutic options better in the future. This session involves basic science and animal research scientists, as well as perinatal clinical scientists, to discuss the Cross-Disciplinary Spotlight on this hot topic.

    Public Health

    Neonatology

    Global Neonatal & Children's Health

    Basic Science Pathway

    Cross-Disciplinary Pathway

    Clinical Research Pathway

  • 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM US CT
    International Stakeholder Collaboration to Develop Neonatal Therapeutics: How to Play Well in the Global Sandbox

    Chair: Jonathan Davis, MD – Tufts Children's Hospital

    Panelist: Thomas Miller, PhD – Bayer

    Panelist: Ronald J. Portman, MD – Novartis Pharmaceuticals

    Panelist: Mark Turner, PhD, FRCPCH – University of Liverpool

    Panelist: Sandra Beauman, MSN, RNC-NIC – University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center

    Panelist: Jennifer Degl, MS – Speaking for Moms & Babies, INC

    Panelist: Deborah Discenza, MA – PreemieWorld

    Although the field of neonatology has evolved significantly since patients were routinely administered chloramphenicol and 100% oxygen, major knowledge gaps and unmet therapeutic needs persist. The majority of drugs used to treat critically ill neonates are used off-label, with incomplete information on dosing, safety, and/or efficacy. Despite efforts to design and perform high-quality neonatal clinical trials, optimal treatments for the unique conditions related to preterm birth remain elusive. To begin addressing these unmet needs, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Critical Path Institute (C-Path) launched the International Neonatal Consortium (INC) in May of 2015. The Consortium convenes academic experts, regulators, nurses, industry sponsors, and patient/parent advocates from across the globe to “forge a predictable regulatory path for evaluating the safety and effectiveness of therapies for neonates.”
    In its first 5 years, INC has achieved notable successes through interdisciplinary collaboration, including:
    Publication of: “Safety, Dosing, and Pharmaceutical Quality for Studies that Evaluate Medicinal Products (Including Biological Products) in Neonates” to assist investigators and sponsors in designing clinical trials (used in FDA Guidance)
    Development of standardized definitions, outcome measures, and master protocols for clinical trials of treatments of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), bronchopulmonary dysplasia, and seizures in order to obtain consistent, robust, and discriminatory data
    Development of a neonatal adverse event severity scale to harmonize adverse event reporting for neonatal clinical trials
    Publication of a paper optimizing long-term neurodevelopmental follow-up assessments following trials of medicinal products in neonates
    Our Cross-Disciplinary approach will highlight the interaction and collaborative efforts needed by key stakeholders to create tools to streamline research on neonatal therapies.

    Neonatology

    Global Neonatal & Children's Health

    Cross-Disciplinary Pathway

    Clinical Research Pathway

    Academic and Research Skills

  • 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM US CT
    Is Congenital Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Infection a Vaccine-Preventable Disease? Candidate Vaccines Enter Clinical Trials Even as Uncertainties About the Protective Role of Maternal Immunity Emerge

    Chair: Mark R. Schleiss, MD – University of Minnesota Medical School

    Chair: Sallie Permar, MD, PhD – Weill Cornell Medicine

    The most important congenital viral infection in the developed world, and probably globally, is congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV). Congenital CMV is the most common infectious disease responsible for neurocognitive deficits in children, and is the leading infectious cause of sensorineural hearing loss. Although development of a vaccine has been a major public health goal for decades, development of a vaccine has been limited by emerging knowledge about the potential for re-infection of immune women during pregnancy with resultant transmission of new strains of viral to the fetus, leading to injury and long-term disability. Thus, there are unresolved questions about the protective role of pre-existing maternal immunity and the viral and host correlates of such immunity. Indeed, some experts suggest that the bulk of disability caused by congenital CMV occurs in the context of infections that occur in the face of preconception immunity. If natural immunity does not protect, then how can a vaccine - which would need to induce immune responses superior to "natural immunity" - succeed?



    To address these controversies, advances in molecular virology and viral immunology research that explore these topics will be presented at this symposium, along with a summary of the CMV vaccines that are currently in clinical trials. A major emphasis will be placed on how this new knowledge is likely to have an impact on the health of children, particularly with respect to long-term disabilities, but other topics, including health policy issues (CMV as a disease of health disparities) and adolescent vaccination questions (how to incorporate another vaccine into the routine schedule) will be reviewed. Policy issues and translational approaches in clinical trials will be integrated with basic science data (the virology and molecular immunology of CMV) to ensure an eclectic, but accessible and informative, program. This state-of-the-art plenary will be of broad appeal to a large number of academic pediatricians. The session will consist of invited lectures from internationally recognized, NIH-funded leaders engaged in study of this topic.

    Well Newborn

    COVID-19

    Breastfeeding/Human Milk

    Scholarly Sessions

    Public Health

    Neonatology

    Infectious Diseases

    Epidemiology & Health Services Pathway

    Community Pediatrics

    Children with Chronic Conditions

    Basic Science Pathway

    Neurology

    Immunizations/Delivery

    General Pediatrics

    Clinical Research Pathway

    Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology

    Adolescent Medicine

  • 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM US CT
    Using Moneyball Approaches to Address Equity in Child Health

    Chair: Jeffrey P. Yaeger, MD, MPH – University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry

    Seasoned baseball scouts are experts at identifying talented prospects just as experienced clinicians are experts at diagnosing and managing patients’ medical conditions. Although both scouts and clinicians may be correct most of the time, mistakes can be costly, leading to millions of dollars of losses for baseball franchises, and potentially preventable morbidity in the health care setting. Over the last 15 years, baseball executives have sought to guard against such mistakes by largely embracing the use of advanced analytic tools to identify those baseball prospects with the most potential for success. Termed “Moneyball,” and immortalized in a film of the same name, advanced analytics have revolutionized the sport as athletes are now throwing harder and hitting more home runs than ever before.

    Health care, on the other hand, has lagged behind. Although we know that health outcomes are largely influenced by behaviors, social circumstances, and physical surroundings, this information is rarely collected and used in diagnosis or medical decision-making. Tools to collect and methods to analyze this important information have not yet been robustly developed, nor adequately applied in healthcare settings to improve outcomes. These skills are needed now more than ever, as pediatricians strive to provide care that is equitable and support patients and families affected by systemic racism, other social injustices, and the COVID-19 pandemic.

    But this is about to change. With the use of advanced technologies such as geospatial analysis, machine learning, and natural language processing, we are now developing tools to not only improve the identification of clinical, but also social and environmental risk factors, and to incorporate this information into clinical decision-making at the point-of-care. Such methods are simultaneously helping to build situational awareness capabilities, critical in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic. These methods, when fully implemented, represent important strategies of enhancing delivery of high-value, equity-driven care. Indeed, clinicians, researchers, communities, and health systems that can harness the vast quantities of clinical, community, education, and government data will be well-positioned to improve child health outcomes, mitigate disparities, optimize decisions, and enhance the value of care. With its focus on utilizing cutting-edge technologies to develop data-driven improvement in outcomes across multiple disciplines, this presentation aligns well with the PAS Meeting’s Strategic Plan.

    The speakers will describe examples of research programs and quality improvement initiatives that have capitalized on each of these three advanced analytic methods. They will discuss how such approaches can be applied across disciplines and sub-specialties, using the fields of public health, general pediatrics, emergency medicine, and hospital medicine as examples. PAS attendees across a multitude of disciplines will be interested in this presentation as it is relevant for those interested in the Digital Therapeutics, Clinical Research, and Advocacy Pathways.

    Using the revolution of baseball analytics as an analogy, the first speaker will set the stage, describing the gap between current analytic capabilities and how pediatricians currently make clinical decisions. All speakers will then focus their discussion on a description of a particular methodology (geospatial analysis, machine learning, and natural language processing), their specific motivation, challenges encountered, how barriers were overcome, and outcomes achieved. They will also discuss how principles can be applied across disciplines and future implications of their work, including challenges and opportunities, specifically as related to equity in care and development of population health situational awareness capabilities. If able, the speakers plan to use a polling system throughout the presentations to more fully inform the depth of each presentation and engage participants. A 20-minute Q&A session will follow the three presentations, allowing audience members to interact with the speakers. Audience members will leave the session with a clear understanding of the capabilities of these technologies and how they might be able to implement them with their own work at their institution.

    Public Health

    Infectious Diseases

    Hospital-based Medicine

    Epidemiology & Health Services Pathway

    Digital Therapeutics Pathway

    Community Pediatrics

    Telemedicine/EHR/Medical Informatics

    Health Services Research

    Health Equity/Social Determinants of Health

    General Pediatrics

    Emergency Medicine

    Cross-Disciplinary Pathway

    Critical Care

    Clinical Research Pathway

    Advocacy Pathway

    Academic and Research Skills

  • 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM US CT
    Adolescent Medicine I

    Moderator: Rachel Katzenellenbogen, MD – Indiana University at Indianapolis

    Moderator: Megan Moreno – University of Wisconsin Madison

    Adolescent Medicine

  • 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM US CT
    Developmental Biology/Cardiac & Pulmonary Development

    Moderator: Heber C. Nielsen, MD, MSDS – Tufts Medical Center and Tufts School of Medicine

    Moderator: Stephanie Ford, MD – UH Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital

  • 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM US CT
    General Pediatrics: Potpourri I

    Moderator: Melissa S. Stockwell, MD MPH – Columbia University Irving Medical Center

    Moderator: Iris W. Borowsky, MD, PhD – University of Minnesota

    General Pediatrics

  • 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM US CT
    Infectious Diseases: COVID-19 & Zika

    Moderator: Pablo J. Sanchez, MD – Nationwide Children's Hospital - The Ohio State University College of Medicine

    Moderator: Michael Bolton, Doctor of Medicine – Our Lady of the Lake Children's Hospital

  • 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM US CT
    Medical Education: Feedback, Coaching, Assessment, and Evaluation

    Moderator: Nadia Bajwa, MD, MHPE – Geneva University Hospitals

    Moderator: Susan Bostwick, MD, MBA – Weill Cornell

    Adolescent Medicine

    Children with Chronic Conditions

    Pulmonology

    Neonatology

    Infectious Diseases

    Hospital-based Medicine

    Education Pathway

    Community Pediatrics

    Neurology

    Nephrology

    General Pediatrics

    Gastroenterology/Hepatology

    Endocrinology

    Emergency Medicine

    Child Abuse & Neglect

    Cardiology

    Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology

  • 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM US CT
    Neonatal General: Survival and Growth

    Moderator: Patrick G. Gallagher, MD – Yale University

    Moderator: Sarah Taylor, MD, MSCR – Yale University School of Medicine

  • 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM US CT
    Pulmonology

    Moderator: Karen Mestan, MD – Northwestern/Lurie Children's Hospital

    Moderator: Antonia Popova, MD – University of Michigan

    Pulmonology

  • 3:00 PM – 3:30 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital's Charles Macias, MD, MPH
  • 3:00 PM – 3:30 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital's Richard Martin, MD
  • 3:00 PM – 3:30 PM US CT
    Trainee Zone Meet the Doctors: Dr. Kristen Hayward | Presented by CARRA

    Presenter: Kristen Hayward, MD – Seattle Children’s Hospital and UWSOM

  • 4:00 PM – 4:30 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital's Charles Macias, MD, MPH
  • 4:00 PM – 4:30 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital's Richard Martin, MD
  • 4:00 PM – 4:30 PM US CT
    Trainee Zone Meet the Doctor: Kate Ackerman, MD | Presented by the University of Rochester/Golisano Children's Hospital

    Presenter: Kate G. Ackerman, MD – University of Rochester

  • 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM US CT
    AAP Presidential Plenary: Understanding Experiences During the COVID-19 Pandemic

    Moderator: Sally Goza, MD, FAAP – American Academy of Pediatrics

    This AAP session will feature highly ranked 2021 PAS abstracts plus AAP leader speaking.

    Cross-Disciplinary Pathway

  • 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM US CT
    Allergy, Immunology, and Rheumatology

    Moderator: Michelle Gill, MD, PhD – UT Southwestern Medical Center

    Moderator: Megan A. Cooper, MD, PhD – Washington University

  • 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM US CT
    Cardiology: Care of the Fetus and Newborn With CHD

    Moderator: Clifford Cua – Nationwide Children's Hospital

    Moderator: Vasu D. Gooty, MD – LeBonheur Children's Hospital

    Cardiology

  • 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM US CT
    Critical Care: Sepsis With a Touch of Delirium

    Moderator: Erin Paquette, MD, JD, MBe, HCEC – Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine/Ann & Robert H Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

    Moderator: Lakshmi Raman, MD – University of Texas at Southwestern Medical Center

    Critical Care

  • 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM US CT
    Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics: Parenting

    Moderator: Alan Mendelsohn – New York University School of Medicine

    Moderator: Susan Berger, PhD – Northwestern University School of Medicine

    Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics

  • 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM US CT
    Gastroenterology/Hepatology

    Moderator: Senthil SankaraRaman, MD – UH Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital, Cleveland

    Moderator: Ruben E. Quiros Tejeira, MD – University of Nebraska Medical Center

    Gastroenterology and Hepatology topics
  • 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM US CT
    Health Services Research I

    Moderator: Margaret Holland, PhD, MPH – Yale University

    Moderator: Christian D. Pulcini, MD, MEd, MPH – University of Vermont Medical Center and Children’s Hospital

    Health Equity/Social Determinants of Health

    Hospital-based Medicine

    Health Services Research

  • 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM US CT
    Neonatal Nephrology/AKI

    Moderator: Keia Sanderson, MD, MSCR – University of North Carolina

    Moderator: SUBRATA SARKAR, MD – University of Michigan Health System

    Critical Care

    Breastfeeding/Human Milk

    Neonatology

    Infectious Diseases

    Children with Chronic Conditions

    Quality Improvement/Patient Safety

    Pharmacology

    Nephrology

  • 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM US CT
    Neonatal Neurology: Basic & Translational I

    Moderator: Sandra E. Juul, MD, PhD – University of Washington

    Moderator: Panagiotis Kratimenos, MD, PhD – Children's National Hospital, George Washington University School of Medicine

    Neurology

    Neonatology

  • 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM US CT
    Neonatal Pulmonology: Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia
  • 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM US CT
    Obesity I

    Moderator: Rachel Gross, MD MS – New York University Grossman School of Medicine / Bellevue Hospital Center

    Moderator: Suzanne Lazorick, MD, MPH, FAAP – East Carolina University

    Well Newborn

    COVID-19

    Public Health

    Obesity

    Neonatology

    Community Pediatrics

    Pediatric Nutrition

    Health Equity/Social Determinants of Health

    General Pediatrics

  • 4:30 PM – 7:00 PM US CT
    Cell Therapy and Regenerative Medicine From Fetus to Childhood

    Chair: Masahiro Hayakawa, MD,PhD – Nagoya University Hospital

    Chair: Charles M. Cotten, MD MHS – Duke University

    Despite recent advances in neonatal intensive care medicine, several neonatal disorders remain major causes of mortality and morbidities. Few effective therapies are currently available to ameliorate the injuries resulting from these disorders. Therefore, developing new safe and effective therapies to improve the outcomes of these disorders is an urgent and considerable issue. Recently, various preclinical studies have shown that stem cell therapy significantly attenuates injuries in newborn animal models of neonatal complications. These findings suggest that stem cell therapy/regenerative therapy might represent the next breakthrough in therapy of these currently intractable and devastating neonatal disorders. In this session, we focus on the results of preclinical/clinical research in several neonatal complications.

    Neonatology

  • 4:30 PM – 7:00 PM US CT
    Intestinal Failure: The Short and Long of It

    Chair: Deborah Neigut, MD – University of Colorado School of Medicine

    Intestinal failure continues to be a significant problem affecting neonates and children. A multi-disciplinary approach to care is essential, as long term survival is dependent on successful nuitritional support with optimoal growth, anticipation of and avoidance of complications, and advancing techniques for improving gut function. The team is complex and requires ongoing involvement of neonatologists, gastroenterologists, hepatologists, surgeons, nutritionists, and social workers.

    Scholarly Sessions

    Neonatology

    Hospital-based Medicine

    Children with Chronic Conditions

    General Pediatrics

    Gastroenterology/Hepatology

    Cross-Disciplinary Pathway

  • 4:30 PM – 7:00 PM US CT
    Leading the Way: Diversity, Child Health, and Leadership

    Chair: Elena Fuentes-Afflick, MD, MPH – Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital and the University of California San Francisco

    Chair: Norman Rosenblum, MD, FRCPC, FCAHS – SickKids Research Institute

    Over the last forty years, the diversity of medical school matriculants has increased dramatically. In the US, women represent half of medical students and the ethnic diversity of medical students has increased, but much more slowly. However, women are underrepresented among leaders who hold leadership roles such as Professor, Department Chair, and Dean. The relative lack of women and underrepresented people in leadership roles may be related to factors including lack of opportunity, lack of mentoring, discrimination, and personal preference. During this session, influential leaders in academic pediatrics and academic medicine will share insights and lessons learned, including review of the most recent data on the representation of women and diverse individuals in leadership roles and highlight programs and efforts to increase diversity among leaders. Building on institutional examples shared by the panelists, we will engage in a discussion to identify new strategies to increase diversity among leaders in academic pediatrics.

    Diversity and Inclusion

    Career Development Pathway

    Advocacy Pathway

    Academic and Research Skills

  • 4:30 PM – 7:00 PM US CT
    Not All NAS Is NOWS: The Global Dilemma of Newborn Drug and Alcohol Exposure and Pandemics

    Chair: Ju Lee Oei, MBBS FRACP MD – Royal Hospital for Women

    The scope of maternal drug use is staggering. In Western societies, at least 1 in 3 children under the age of 14 are estimated to live with a parent or caregiver using some form of drug of dependency. This accounts for more than 9 million children in the USA alone. Enormous attention has been placed on the consequences of maternal opioid use which can result in the Neonatal Opioid Withdrawal Syndrome (NOWS) or Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS), one of the fastest growing and costly public health epidemics in the world.

    Mothers, however, use many other drugs besides opioids and their newborns can be affected by all of them. These drugs can be illegal (e.g. cocaine, methamphetamines), some are essential for maternal health (e.g. prescription medications), and others are an almost ubiquitous element of society (e.g. alcohol, tobacco, marijuana). The adverse consequences of these drugs are extensive, pervasive, and enduring. Not only is the individual child affected, but the family, society and even subsequent generations can be impacted by maternal drug use. At a societal level, maternal drug use is inextricably intertwined with profound economic, intergenerational, and perpetuating burden and harm. On an individual level, the drug-exposed infant is not only at risk of withdrawal but also of teratogenicity, epigenetic change, neurocognitive impairment, and poor adult outcomes (dependent on both prenatal exposures and postnatal environmental influences).

    Efforts to minimize harm from parental drug use requires global, coordinated, and continuing efforts. This is especially true with regard to the impact of the current COVID-19 pandemic on maternal use of addictive substances and its relation to translation of research and practice to policies that have considerable potential to influence individuals, families, and whole communities around the globe. In this session, international clinical, research and policy experts will discuss the latest evidence and knowledge gaps in this area. We will discuss contemporary evidence from randomized controlled studies and observational and cohort studies, particularly focusing on NOWS and other drugs of addiction that may not cause classical signs of abstinence such as cannabis, cocaine and methamphetamines. We will also examine the rationale behind decision-making at clinical and policy levels for the care of children affected by parental drug use in the USA and around the world. We will discuss the long-term and including epigenetic and non-withdrawal implications of prenatal drug exposure and also the legal, societal and health implications of legal drugs of addiction such as alcohol, nicotine and prescription medications.

    This session will emphasize the necessity of international collaboration and the consideration of other drugs besides opioids in the quest for improving the lives of children affected by maternal drug use especially in the current crisis of the COVID-19 pandemic

    Public Health

    Neonatology

    Epidemiology & Health Services Pathway

    Community Pediatrics

    Advocacy Pathway

    Adolescent Medicine

  • 4:30 PM – 7:00 PM US CT
    Prenatal Environmental Contaminants and Childhood Disease: Latest Evidence for Epigenetic Mechanisms Associated With Transgenerational Disease, and Public Policy Implications

    Chair: Paul D. Winchester, MA MD – Indiana University School of Medicine

    This video is unavailable at the request of one or more presenters.
    Three generational animal models now conclusively demonstrate that fetal exposure to the same environmental chemicals now found in virtually every human pregnancy is linked to multigenerational disease. The diseases range from onset of puberty abnormalities, obesity, immune disorderes,cancer,polycystic ovaries, abormal sperm,behavioral abnormalities and perinatal complications. The mechanism of transmission of disease across generations appears to be non-genetic and correlates with epigenetic changes seen in exposed offspring and their descendants.This symposium will present the latest animal data after fetal exposure to: pesticides (DDT, premethrin,vinclozolin,atrazine, glyphosate,DEET), dioxins, jet fuel, plastics, BPA,(M Skinner), The latest data on human pesticide exposures and outcomes of pregnancy: glyphosate (P. Winchester) and long term outcomes after organophosphate exposures in pregnancy (B.Eskenazi). Diseases which have been induced in third generation descendants in rodents will be compared with human disease trends and latest funded research will be reviewed. Environmental contaminants are pervasive in pregnant women, and diseases which they cause in animals are increasing in humans. Can we begin to apply what has been learned in animals to human health (while we wait the 100 years it might take to follow a three generational human study)? Finally, we will discuss the state of governmental agencies whose mandate to protect our pregnant mothers and our children from environmental contamination. (R. Etzel).

    Breastfeeding/Human Milk

    Asthma

    Tobacco Prevention

    Pulmonology

    Public Health

    Obesity

    Neonatology

    Mental Health

    Hematology/Oncology

    Global Neonatal & Children's Health

    Genomics

    Epidemiology & Health Services Pathway

    Environmental Health

    Developmental Biology

    Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics

    Community Pediatrics

    Children with Chronic Conditions

    Basic Science Pathway

    Pharmacology

    Pediatric Nutrition

    Neurology

    Nephrology

    Immigrant Health

    Health Services Research

    Health Equity/Social Determinants of Health

    General Pediatrics

    Gastroenterology/Hepatology

    Endocrinology

    Cross-Disciplinary Pathway

    Clinical Research Pathway

    Child Abuse & Neglect

    Career Development Pathway

    Cardiology

    Advocacy Pathway

    Adolescent Medicine

    Academic and Research Skills

  • 5:00 PM – 7:00 PM US CT
    Telemedicine/EHR/Medical Informatics: EHR

    Moderator: Dunc Williams, Jr., PhD – Medical University of South Carolina

    Moderator: Paul M. Darden, MD – The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center

    Telemedicine/EHR/Medical Informatics

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Allergy, Immunology, and Rheumatology: Highlighted e-Posters

    Moderator: Megan A. Cooper, MD, PhD – Washington University

    Moderator: Hilary M. Haftel, MD MHPE FAAP – American Academy of Pediatrics

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Allergy, Immunology, and Rheumatology: Highlighted e-Posters Live Q&A

    Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Cardiology: Highlighted e-Posters

    Moderator: Lee A. Pyles, MD, MS – West Virginia University

    Moderator: Hugo R. Martinez, MD – Le Bonheur Children's Hospital

    Cardiology

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Cardiology: Highlighted e-Posters Live Q&A

    Cardiology

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Critical Care: Highlighted e-Posters

    Moderator: Lisa Delsignore, MD – Tufts Children's Hospital

    Moderator: Emilie Henry, MD – University of Oklahoma

    Critical Care

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Critical Care: Highlighted e-Posters Live Q&A

    Critical Care

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics: Highlighted e-Posters

    Moderator: Heidi M. Feldman, MD PhD – Stanford University School of Medicine

    Moderator: Neelkamal Soares, MD – Western Michigan University Homer Stryker MD School of Medicine

    Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics: Highlighted e-Posters Live Q&A

    Moderator: Neelkamal Soares, MD – Western Michigan University Homer Stryker MD School of Medicine

    Presenter: Heidi M. Feldman, MD PhD – Stanford University School of Medicine

    Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Health Equity/Social Determinants of Health: Highlighted e-Posters

    Moderator: Nicole E. Webb, MD – Valley Children's Healthcare

    Moderator: Jana C. Leary, MD, MS – Floating Hospital for Children at Tufts Medical Center

    Advocacy Pathway

    Well Newborn

    Trainee Pathway

    COVID-19

    Asthma

    Scholarly Sessions

    Pulmonology

    Public Health

    Mental Health

    Injury Prevention

    Hospital-based Medicine

    Environmental Health

    Education Pathway

    Diversity and Inclusion

    Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics

    Community Pediatrics

    Children with Chronic Conditions

    School and Community Health

    Quality Improvement/Patient Safety

    Pediatric Nutrition

    Literacy

    Immigrant Health

    Health Equity/Social Determinants of Health

    General Pediatrics

    Clinical Research Pathway

    Cardiology

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Health Equity/Social Determinants of Health: Highlighted e-Posters Live Q&A

    Health Equity/Social Determinants of Health

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Infectious Diseases: Highlighted e-Posters

    Moderator: Asuncion Mejias, MD, PhD, MSCS – Nationwide Children's Hospital

    Moderator: Rachel Katzenellenbogen, MD – Indiana University at Indianapolis

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Infectious Diseases: Highlighted e-Posters Live Q&A

    Infectious Diseases

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Medical Education: Highlighted e-Posters

    Moderator: Dewesh Agrawal, MD – Children's National Hospital, Washington, DC

    Moderator: Heather McPhillips, MD, MPH – University of Washington

    Cardiology

    Trainee Pathway

    COVID-19

    Pulmonology

    Neonatology

    Infectious Diseases

    Hospital-based Medicine

    Hematology/Oncology

    Education Pathway

    Diversity and Inclusion

    Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics

    Community Pediatrics

    Neurology

    Nephrology

    General Pediatrics

    Gastroenterology/Hepatology

    Endocrinology

    Emergency Medicine

    Critical Care

    Child Abuse & Neglect

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Medical Education: Highlighted e-Posters Live Q&A

    Education Pathway

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Neonatal Neurology: Clinical: Highlighted e-Posters?HIE Live Q&A

    Neonatology

    Neurology

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Neonatal Neurology: Clinical: Highlighted e-Posters−HIE

    Moderator: An Massaro, MD – FDA

    Moderator: INDIRA BHAGAT, MD – Children Hospital of Michigan Detroit, Michigan

    Neurology

    Neonatology

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Neonatal Respiratory Assessment/Support/Ventilation: Highlighted e-Posters

    Moderator: Rachel G. Greenberg, MD, MB, MHS – Duke University, Duke Clinical Research Institute

    Moderator: John Kinsella, MD – University of Colorado/Children's Hospital Colorado

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Neonatal Respiratory Assessment/Support/Ventilation: Highlighted e-Posters Live Q&A

    Neonatology

    Pulmonology

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Nephrology: Highlighted e-Posters

    Moderator: Julie R. Ingelfinger, MD – Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School

    Moderator: F. Bruder Stapleton, MD – University of Washington School of Medicine

    Critical Care

    Infectious Diseases

    Diversity and Inclusion

    Nephrology

    General Pediatrics

    Emergency Medicine

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Nephrology: Highlighted e-Posters Live Q&A

    Nephrology

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Obesity: Highlighted e-Posters

    Moderator: Jeanie B. Tryggestad, MD – University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center

    Moderator: Mona A. Eissa, MD, MPH, PhD – The University of Texas McGovern Medical School at Houston

    Well Newborn

    COVID-19

    Public Health

    Obesity

    Neonatology

    Community Pediatrics

    Pediatric Nutrition

    Health Equity/Social Determinants of Health

    General Pediatrics

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Obesity: Highlighted e-Posters Live Q&A

    Obesity

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Quality Improvement/Patient Safety: Highlighted e-Posters

    Moderator: David Keller, MD – University of Colorado School of Medicine/Children's Hospital Colorado

    Moderator: Joanne E. Cox, MD – Boston Children's Hospital

    Quality Improvement/Patient Safety

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Quality Improvement/Patient Safety: Highlighted e-Posters Live Q&A

    Quality Improvement/Patient Safety

  • 7:00 PM – 8:00 PM US CT
    Boston Children’s Hospital Alumni Association Reception at Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting
    Virtual event that would replace an in person reception
  • 7:00 PM – 8:00 PM US CT
    UCLA Department of Pediatrics Reception
  • 7:00 PM – 8:00 PM US CT
    University of Rochester, Golisano Children’s Hospital Alumni & Friends Event
    Virtual Alumni & Friends Event
  • 7:15 PM – 8:30 PM US CT
    Central Precocious Puberty: Solving the Puzzle
    Central precocious puberty (CPP) is the onset of development signs of sexual maturation earlier than would be expected based on population forms, typically defined as puberty onset before 8 years in girls and 9 years in boys. Early identification and treatment are critical when true precocious puberty is present. The need for timely attention to apparent premature development is augmented by the possibility that precocious puberty is the result of a tumor or other disorder. In this virtual CME-accredited satellite symposium, two experts in CPP will discuss strategies for improving early detection of this disorder by recognizing clinical signs and symptoms, review testing options for diagnosis, determine when to refer to a pediatric endocrinologist for further management, and reviewing existing and newly available treatment options for patients with CPP. Register here: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_TMSGkNMNQb25ddYvefibwQ