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Full Schedule

Full Schedule

  • Sunday, May 2, 2021
  • 7:00 AM – 8:30 AM US CT
    Pediatric Policy Council Legislative Breakfast: The Impact of the 2020 Election on Child Health

    Chair: Shetal Shah, MD – Maria Fareri Children's Hospital/ New York Medical College

    In November 2020, voters cast their ballots for president and public officials up and down the ballot. Their choices have significant ramifications for the future of pediatric research and child health policy in the United States. With the COVID-19 pandemic continuing to dominate the nation's attention, health care policy has never been more relevant to the national policy debate. The pandemic has highlighted both longstanding inequities and the strengths and weaknesses of American public health and biomedical research infrastructure. Elected leaders are taking the mandate given to them by voters and crafting policies to address this public health emergency and those to come. At this critical moment, it is critical to engage elected officials on child health policy to strengthen the pediatric research enterprise and improve the health and well-being of America's young people. This session will focus on opportunities to advance a child health agenda in the current political environment. It will review the child health and economic policies being debated and analyze their potential impact on child health outcomes. The session will discuss how the current political environment and public opinion may offer opportunities and challenges to advance a child health agenda. Mark Del Monte, JD, chief executive officer and executive vice president at the American Academy of Pediatrics, and Shetal Shah, MD, chair of the Pediatric Policy Council will be joined by a political expert to offer commentary and engage the audience in dialogue on these critical public policy issues.

    Public Health

    Advocacy Pathway

  • 8:45 AM – 11:00 AM US CT
    APA Presidential Plenary

    President: Latha Chandran, MD,MPH – University of Miami Miller School of Medicine

    George Armstrong established the first dispensary for children in London, England in 1769. This honorary lecture showcases an outstanding contributor to our knowledge of the care of children. The 2021 George Armstrong Lecturer is Dr. Makini Chisolm-Straker, the co-founder of HEAL Trafficking and associate professor of emergency medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

    Cross-Disciplinary Pathway

  • 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM US CT
    A National Perspective on Addressing Social Determinants of Health During and After the COVID-19 Pandemic to Make a Real Difference in Children's Lives

    Chair: Benard Dreyer, MD – NYU Grossman School of Medicine

    In 2016, the American Academy of Pediatrics published a policy entitled "Poverty and Child Health" recommending screening families for the social determinants of health (SDOH) and connecting families with resources in their community to help them with basic needs and benefits. Many pediatricians and pediatric programs have worked on setting up systems to make this happen. We know from research performed by the faculty of this session that while most pediatricians think that screening for addressing health-related social needs is important, many fewer report that screening is feasible or feel prepared to address families’ social needs. This symposium brings together national experts in SDOH and implementation science as well as members of a large collaborative that worked with 11 health care institutions over several years to integrate SDOH screening and referral at the primary care level with community-based organizations to improve the health and welfare of children. We will start with an overview of the evidence for both the need for these activities as well as the evidence for effective implementation and positive effects on child outcomes. We will next describe the design and results of the collaborative effort, including modifications during the COVID Pandemic with real-life details from one of the health care sites. This will allow attendees to get into the nuts and bolts of such efforts. Faculty will then reflect on what was presented and re-connect these efforts to the national scene, highlighting the degree to which the Pandemic has magnified the importance of addressing the SDOH.

    COVID-19

    Epidemiology & Health Services Pathway

    Diversity and Inclusion

    Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics

    Core Curriculum for Fellows

    Community Pediatrics

    Children with Chronic Conditions

    Quality Improvement/Patient Safety

    Immigrant Health

    Health Services Research

    Health Equity/Social Determinants of Health

    General Pediatrics

    Cross-Disciplinary Pathway

    Clinical Research Pathway

    Child Abuse & Neglect

    Advocacy Pathway

  • 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM US CT
    Adherence to Treatment: Barriers to Making It Stick

    Chair: Tray Hunley, MD – Vanderbilt University Medical Center

    Chair: Jun Oh – University Children’s Hospital, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf


    Pediatric patients with kidney disease are often inundated with medical interventions including medications, dietary and fluid restrictions, dialysis regimens, and blood pressure monitoring. Realistically, it is rare that patients and their families can adhere to every aspect of a complex care plan, even in the best of circumstances. However, medication adherence remains a major predictor of clinical outcomes over time has care evolved. This sessions will cover the factors that can modify adherence and interventions to improve adherence adaptable to all aspects of pediatric kidney health management.

    Core Curriculum for Fellows

    Community Pediatrics

    Children with Chronic Conditions

    Telemedicine/EHR/Medical Informatics

    Nephrology

    Health Equity/Social Determinants of Health

    General Pediatrics

    Cross-Disciplinary Pathway

    Adolescent Medicine

  • 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM US CT
    Expanding Outpatient Antibiotic Stewardship: Practical Strategies, Novel Settings, and Sociobehavioral Influences

    Chair: Michael J. Smith, MD MSCE – Duke University

    Chair: Alison Tribble, MD, MSCE – University of Michigan

    Antibiotic stewardship has been defined as "coordinated interventions designed to improve and measure the appropriate use of antibiotic agents." More than 80% of all antibiotics given to children are prescribed in the outpatient setting, yet there remain few formalized activities to promote antibiotic stewardship in this setting. During this session, national leaders will highlight novel settings for outpatient pediatric stewardship and discuss useful and effective outpatient stewardship interventions and techniques. These will include best practices in communicating about antibiotics with parents, description of behavioral nudges to improve antibiotic prescribing, harnessing electronic tools to drive improvement, identifying best practices in use of ambulatory diagnostic tests to guide antibiotic management, and data demonstrating ways in which antibiotic prescribing for children is racially biased. This session will therefore provide practical tools for participants to improve the quality of their antibiotic prescribing, will address important issues of equity in medicine, and will be relevant to general pediatricians, hospitalists, emergency medicine and infectious diseases specialists, and those who work in emergency departments, urgent care centers, ambulatory clinics, and ambulatory health care systems.

    Public Health

    Infectious Diseases

    Epidemiology & Health Services Pathway

    Diversity and Inclusion

    Community Pediatrics

    Health Services Research

    General Pediatrics

    Emergency Medicine

  • 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM US CT
    Microbial Metabolites Associated With Immunity and Central Nervous System Health in Early Life: Opportunities for Biomarker Discovery and Therapeutics

    Chair: Mohan Pammi, MD, PhD, MRCPCH – Baylor College of Medicine

    Chair: Josef Neu, MD – University of Florida

    The human microbiome and their metabolic processes play a vital role in human pathophysiology. Advancing technology including metabolomics and next generation sequencing have provided a better and holistic understanding of disease pathophysiology as it relates to the human microbiome. In this proposed symposium, we will discuss the influence of microbial metabolites and products on mucosal immunology and health of the central nervous system. We will also explore the role of microbial metabolites as opportunities for discovery of biomarkers and novel therapeutics.

    The Microbiome in Early Life: The fetus and newborn undergoes major transitions in relation to microbial exposures before, during and shortly after the birthing process. The relatively naïve neonatal microbiome along with the interaction between microbial components and metabolites and the hosts’ responses mature and evolve rapidly. Prior to birth, emerging evidence supports that the maternal and fetal ecosystems play a role in timing of delivery. At birth, vaginal versus cesarean delivery and the events surrounding these processes, as well as feeding and feeding composition, antibiotic exposure and the environment influence the developing neonatal microbiome. During the neonatal period, microbial dysbiosis has been implicated in neonatal diseases such as necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiome has been implicated in immune dysregulation (allergic and autoimmune disorders). A genetic predisposition, along with an altered microbiome and environmental triggers have been associated with a “perfect storm” for the pathogenesis of Type 1 diabetes and other autoimmune diseases.

    Metabolomics is the latest of the ‘omics’ technology and identifies distinct patterns of small molecules generated during both host and microbial cellular metabolism. These biomarkers may help in disease diagnosis, prediction or prognostication. Microbial metabolite pattern may be useful in diseases associated with dysbiosis. Metabolite patterns are dynamic, changing with gestational age, chronological age or disease process and gives us a snapshot of the metabolic milieu of the organism. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry are the ones most common techniques employed. The metabolites produced by microbes and/or the host may regulate transcriptional and translational events that can be evaluated using transcriptomics and proteomics.

    Microbiota, metabolites and CNS health: The intestinal microbiota and the brain communicate in many ways via the immune system, metabolites, the vagus nerve and the enteric nervous system (ENS). Microbial metabolites including those of tryptophan metabolism, short-chain fatty acids, branched chain amino acids, and peptidoglycans may act as signaling molecules that have direct or indirect effects on the CNS and the ENS. Gut microbiota have been shown to influence developmental processes including neurogenesis, myelination, glial cell function, synaptic pruning and blood‐brain barrier permeability and in adult animals, microglial activation and neuroinflammation. It is possible that there may be a critical period or window in early life when the gut microbial composition is crucial and perturbation of the gut microbiota during this period causes long‐lasting effects on the development of the CNS and the ENS. The intestinal microbiome (gut)-brain axis has been implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorders, anxiety, obesity, schizophrenia, Parkinson’s disease, and Alzheimer’s disease. Most of the studies have shown associations without strong support for causality. Although animal and cell culture models can be helpful to better delineate mechanisms and causality, translational research with multi-omic approaches can provide evidence of causality.

    Microbiota, metabolites and mucosal immunology: The commensal microbiome in the intestine regulates the maturation of the mucosal immune system, while the pathogenic microbiome causes immune dysfunction, resulting in inflammation and disease. The gut mucosal immune system, which consists of lymph nodes, lamina propria and epithelial cells, constitutes a protective barrier for the integrity of the intestinal tract. The composition of the gut microbiota is under the surveillance of the normal mucosal immune system. Inflammation, which is caused by abnormal immune responses, influences the balance of the gut microbiome, resulting in intestinal diseases. Microbiota as well as their cell components and their metabolites act as environmental triggers that influence mammalian gene expression as well as innate and adaptive immune responses. Recognition of commensal-derived PAMPs, such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS) by the intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) induce secretion of the antimicrobial peptide RegIIIg, which mediates colonization resistance in the gut. Microbiota-derived signals, butyrate, propionate and acetate (short chain fatty acids, SCFAs), induce IL-18 production from the IEC through activation of NOD-like family, receptors (NLRs) . Acetate produced by Bifidobacteria promotes epithelial cell barrier function by inducing an anti-apoptotic response in the IEC. The tryptophan/serotonin metabolic pathway, crucial in regulation of numerous neural responses rely on microbial production.

    Microbial metabolites for diagnostics and therapeutics: Since presence of microbial dysbiosis may represent a disease phenotype, the intestinal microbiota and their metabolites have become effective targets for the development of new diagnostic methods. These diagnostic method may target markers of intestinal inflammation/ injury or those of systemic inflammation. Biomarkers include testing the blood (e.g. cytokines, CRP, procalcitonin, intestinal fatty acid binding protein, I-FABP) or non-invasive from stools (e.g. calprotectin, volatile organic acids) or from urine (I-FABP in urine, serum amyloid A in the urine). If dysbiosis is associated with disease, then optimizing the gut microbiome will likely represent an effective treatment for intestinal or other inflammatory diseases (fecal microbial transplant therapy).

    Neonatology

    Infectious Diseases

    Developmental Biology

    Neurology

    Cross-Disciplinary Pathway

    Clinical Research Pathway

  • 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM US CT
    The Neurological Implications of Abnormal Glycemia in Neonatal Encephalopathy and Prematurity

    Chair: Emily W.Y Tam, MDCM, MAS, FFRCPC – Hospital for Sick Children

    Chair: Sudeepta K. Basu, MBBS, MS – Children's National Hospital

    Chair: Elana Pinchefsky, MDCM, MSc, FRCPC – Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Sainte-Justine

    Hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia have important implications to the developing brain, especially in newborns with neonatal encephalopathy or born preterm. This Symposium will discuss neonatal glucose homeostasis and brain metabolism with special emphasis on the newborns with high risk of neurologic injury. We will discuss the lessons learned from hypoglycemia in asymptomatic infants which can guide management of other cohorts of at-risk newborns. We will review the emerging evidence for distinct neuroimaging and electrographic phenotypes of brain injury and adverse outcomes in relation with early glycemic status in newborns with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. We will also review the current understanding and management recommendations for disturbed glycemic status in preterm newborns with emphasis on neurodevelopmental outcomes.

    Neonatology

    Neurology

  • 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM US CT
    The Role of Research in Reducing Gun Violence: A Pediatric Policy Council State of the Art Plenary

    Chair: Shetal Shah, MD – Maria Fareri Children's Hospital/ New York Medical College

    Chair: Shale L. Wong, MD, MSPH – University of Colorado, School of Medicine, Dept of Pediatrics

    This video is unavailable at the request of one or more presenters.
    The toll of gun violence on young people represents one of the most significant public health challenges facing contemporary America. In recent years, firearm-related injury and death has made headlines routinely, including mass shootings at schools, public festivals, and places of worship, while daily occurrences of gun violence affect local communities. Gun violence touches young people directly, impacting them, their family members, and friends. Additionally, the ongoing threat of gun violence, reinforced through regular active shooter drills in schools and media reports, extends the detrimental effects of gun violence further through biological stress mechanisms. Despite the frequency of these tragic events, too little research into interventions and public policies to reduce gun violence has been conducted in over two decades due in large part to a reticence on the part of the federal government to fund such work. In 2019, the Pediatric Policy Council engaged in successful advocacy efforts that helped to appropriate $25 million to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health to administer grants for firearm research. Still, the United States has lagged behind its peers in identifying and implementing policies to address this problem. This session will explore the role of public health research in iterative policymaking to reduce gun violence in America. The goal will be to introduce key concepts to pediatric academicians, setting the stage for a moderated panel discussion.

    Public Health

    Injury Prevention

    School and Community Health

    Advocacy Pathway

  • 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM US CT
    Cardiology: Heart Disease in the Older Child

    Moderator: Ashraf S. Harahsheh, MD, F.A.C.C., F.A.A.P. – Children's National Hospital/ George Washington University

    Moderator: Kriti Puri, MBBS – Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children's Hospital

    Cardiology

  • 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM US CT
    Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics: Autism

    Moderator: Kate Wallis, MD, MPH – The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

    Moderator: Diane Langkamp, MD, MPH – Akron Children's Hospital/ NEOMED

    Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics

  • 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM US CT
    Hematology/Oncology

    Moderator: Andrew W. Walter, MS MD – A. I. duPont Hospital for Children

    Moderator: SHAFQAT SHAH, MD – UTHealth San Antonio Long School of Medicine

  • 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM US CT
    Neonatal General: Clinical Outcomes

    Moderator: Jonathan Davis, MD – Tufts Children's Hospital

    Moderator: SANJIV B. AMIN, MD, MS – University of New Mexico

  • 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM US CT
    Neonatal/Infant Resuscitation

    Moderator: Helen G. Liley, MBChB FRACP – Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland

    Moderator: Jayasree Nair, MBBS, MD – SUNY Buffalo

    AAP Neonatal Resuscitation Program Steering Committee

  • 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM US CT
    Quality Improvement/Patient Safety: Hospital-based QI - General I

    Moderator: Joseph Flynn, MD, MS – University of Washington School of Medicine

    Moderator: Roshan George, MD – Emory University and Children's Healthcare of Atlanta

    Quality Improvement/Patient Safety

    Hospital-based Medicine

  • 11:00 AM – 11:30 AM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital's Cynthia Bearer, MD, PhD
  • 11:00 AM – 11:30 AM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital's Michael Dell, MD
  • 11:00 AM – 11:30 AM US CT
    Trainee Zone Networking: Opportunities in Pediatric Complex Care | Presented by APA

    Presenter: Emily Goodwin – Children's Mercy Kansas City; University of Missouri Kansas City School of Medicine

    Presenter: Diana M. Cejas, MD, MPH – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

    Presenter: Kathleen Huth, MD, MMSc – Boston Children's Hospital / Harvard Medical School

    Presenter: Rishi Agrawal, MD, MPH – Lurie Children's Hospital

  • 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: C.S. Mott Children's Hospital, University of Michigan Health's Carey Lumeng, M.D., Ph.D.
  • 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: C.S. Mott Children's Hospital, University of Michigan Health's Erin Carlton, M.D., MSc
  • 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: C.S. Mott Children's Hospital, University of Michigan Health's Georgina Koch
  • 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: C.S. Mott Children's Hospital, University of Michigan Health's John Barks, M.D.
  • 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Children's Wisconsin/Medical College of Wisconsin's Karen Marcdante, MD
  • 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Children's Wisconsin/Medical College of Wisconsin's Vanessa McFadden, MD, PhD
  • 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital's Cynthia Bearer, MD, PhD
  • 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital's Michael Dell, MD
  • 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: University of Rochester/Golisano Children's Hospital's Patricia Chess, MD, MS
  • 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: University of Rochester/Golisano Children's Hospital's Tom Mariani, PhD
  • 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Vanderbilt University Medical Center Department of Pediatrics' Kris Rehm, MD, MMHC, SFHM
  • 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Vanderbilt University Medical Center Department of Pediatrics' Kristen Noble, MD, PhD
  • 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM US CT
    A Tribute to Dr. Maria Delivoria-Papadopoulos: From Basic Science to Clinical Trials – Physician-Researcher Journeys and Collaborations in Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy

    Chair: Donna Ferriero, MD MS – UCSF

    Chair: Nathalie Maitre, MD, PhD – Nationwide Children's Hospital

    This video is unavailable at the request of one or more presenters.
    Through the topic of development of HIE therapeutics and trials, we want the audience to gain an understanding of the continuum between basic science, epidemiological, patient-oriented and clinical research, all while keeping in mind the driving reasons behind neonatal research: patient care. During decades of an incredible career, Dr. Delivoria-Papadopoulos contributed immensely to our understanding of the cellular mechanisms of cerebral injury following hypoxia. We dedicate this session to Dr. Delivoria-Papadopoulos, in recognition of her many contributions and mentoring to advance the field of basic-translational HIE research. In honor of her vision, each researcher across the continuum will show how collaboration with others has contributed to either a critical finding or overcoming a major obstacle. Dr Donna Ferriero will introduce the tribute and Dr Nathalie Maitre will moderate the Q and A session.

    Presenters will explain the evolution of their science through their career, with one key finding and challenging time and the collaborations and partnerships they have leveraged along the way. The following four researchers across the continuum of career trajectories (mix of senior, mid and early career investigators) will discuss both scientific and career lessons learned from working in the field of neonatal neuroprotection.

    Through the topic of development of HIE therapeutics and trials, we want the audience to gain an understanding of the continuum between basic science, epidemiological, patient-oriented and clinical research, all while keeping in mind the driving reasons behind neonatal research: patient care. During decades of an incredible career, Dr. Delivoria-Papadopoulos contributed immensely to our understanding of the cellular mechanisms of cerebral injury following hypoxia. We dedicate this session to Dr. Delivoria-Papadopoulos, in recognition of her many contributions and mentoring to advance the field of basic-translational HIE research. In honor of her vision, each researcher across the continuum will show how collaboration with others has contributed to either a critical finding or overcoming a major obstacle. Dr Donna Ferriero will introduce the tribute and Dr Nathalie Maitre (?) will moderate the Q and A session.

    Presenters will explain the evolution of their science through their career, with one key finding and challenging time and the collaborations and partnerships they have leveraged along the way. The following four researchers across the continuum of career trajectories (mix of senior, mid and early career investigators) will discuss both scientific and career lessons learned from working in the field of neonatal neuroprotection.

    From the first preclinical work on Erythropoietin to current large clinical trials, Dr Juul’s research trajectory gives us an overview of what it is to bring a treatment for HIE from the bench to the bedside. She will discuss a few key findings, transitions and challenges that led to large scale research on one of the first new neuroprotective agents in neonatal care.

    Dr Tai Wu, an early career investigator and newly elected SPR member, will describe how MRI areas of higher brain temperature correlate with energy failure and excitotoxicity, and describe the challenges of translating fundamental in vivo findings to the bedside.

    Dr. Chalak will illustrate the importance of developing novel assessments in patient-based research for HIE. She will demonstrate how an array of rigorous measurement of treatment effect, spanning serum biomarkers to a novel brain-based pattern of classification, can offer mechanistic insights to clinical HIE trials. She will talk about the challenges of using traditional clinical trials models in current HIE reserch.

    Dr Yvonne Wu, a senior investigator will finish by commenting on a combined approach using clinical trials and epidemiologic studies to develop new strategies for treating and preventing HIE. She will discuss her work on developing novel strategies during labor and delivery that will better predict HIE and related birth outcomes so that treatments and biomarkers have a greater impact in the long-term.

    Trainee Pathway

    Scholarly Sessions

    Neonatology

    Neurology

    Cross-Disciplinary Pathway

    Clinical Research Pathway

    Academic and Research Skills

  • 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM US CT
    APS Plenary Series: 2020-The Year That Wasn’t

    Cross-Disciplinary Pathway

  • 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM US CT
    Hot Topic Debates: Antibiotic Use in Hospitalized Children

    Chair: Rana F. Hamdy, MD, MPH, MSCE – Children's National Hospital

    Chair: Matthew Kronman, MD, MSCE – University of Washington

    Antibiotic use in hospitalized children is now closely scrutinized by antibiotic stewardship programs. This session will involve 3 debates on hot topics relating to how antibiotic use should be managed for hospitalized children, including whether antibiotic use for non-infectious conditions (such as to promote gastric motility) should be regulated and reduced; whether early transition to oral antibiotic therapy for infections in hospitalized children is safe and effective; and whether other diagnostic tests – biomarkers like CRP or procalcitonin – should be used to guide antibiotic therapy in our patients. During this session, national leaders in Gastroenterology, Infectious Diseases, and Critical Care Medicine will debate these topics. The format will involve three 30 minute debates, in which each speaker will review the scientific evidence for her/his position for 8-10 minutes (maximum 20 minutes total), each speaker will have a chance to respond to the other speaker for 2 minutes (4 minutes total), and in which audience participation will be garnered through live polling and questions will be allowed (remaining 6-10 minutes total). The presentation of the initial position could be pre-recorded, while the rebuttals and Q&A section would be live. The overarching goal of the session is to highlight the evidence for and against the antibiotic management strategies covered for these common situations in hospitalized children, and to provide a fun and interactive session reaching a broad multidisciplinary audience.

    This engaging session will therefore be relevant to those who care for hospitalized children, including medical student and resident trainees, general pediatricians, hospitalists, and specialists in emergency medicine, gastroenterology, and infectious diseases.

    Infectious Diseases

    Hospital-based Medicine

    Epidemiology & Health Services Pathway

    Children with Chronic Conditions

    Quality Improvement/Patient Safety

    Health Services Research

    General Pediatrics

    Gastroenterology/Hepatology

    Critical Care

    Clinical Research Pathway

  • 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM US CT
    Improving Access and Outcomes in Pediatric Renal Transplant Recipients

    Chair: Amy Bobrowski, MD MS – Cleveland Clinic Children's

    Chair: Scott T. McEwen, MD, PhD – University of Minnesota Twin Cities

    The goal of this session is to address specific issues that contribute to shortened lifespan, even after successful pediatric kidney transplantation. The leading cause of late mortality is premature cardiovascular disease, and this risk of death is much greater after graft failure and return to dialysis. Therefore, strategies to improve immunologic outcomes and prolong the life of a child’s first graft are paramount, and will be addressed in the first 2 talks. The second 2 talks will focus reducing mortality in our patients who are already successfully transplanted per our current protocols. First we will discuss the current data on CVD outcomes in this population, and the relative roles of both modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors. The final talk will address multidisciplinary ideas for practical, programmatic ways to teach and encourage healthy lifestyle choices, and to empower transplant recipients toward self-sufficiency and self-care as they mature.

    Obesity

    Hospital-based Medicine

    Children with Chronic Conditions

    Basic Science Pathway

    Nephrology

    Health Equity/Social Determinants of Health

    Cardiology

    Adolescent Medicine

  • 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM US CT
    Lessons From the Pandemic: How a Children’s Hospital Responded to the Challenges of COVID-19

    Chair: John Lantos, MD – U Missouri-KC

    The COVID-19 pandemic challenged doctors and hospital administrators as did no other event in our lifetimes. Leaders needed to develop a pandemic command structure with the agility to respond to rapidly evolving situations. They had to deal with drastic financial implications, develop new methods of delivering health care, and collaborate regionally. They learned the importance of communication with staff, policy makers, the local medical community, and the public. They had to allocate of scarce resources internally and externally, and balancing rational policy making against irrational fears. For children’s hospitals, some specific challenges included determining our role in a pandemic that predominately affected adults, doing research on the unique pediatric manifestations of disease, and dealing with questions about schools and daycare. In this workshop, leaders from hospital administration, infectious disease, and disaster preparedness will review and analyze some of our experiences and responses at a large quaternary care children’s hospital. We will use specific events and decisions to illustrate the unique challenges and our retrospective analysis of whether we could have done better. The goal of the interactive workshop is to learn together from our collective experience in order to be better prepared for future events.

    Infectious Diseases

  • 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM US CT
    The 2021 American Academy of Pediatrics Clinical Practice Guideline for Febrile Infants 8-60 Days

    Chair: Robert H. Pantell, MD – UCSF

    This video is unavailable at the request of one or more presenters.
    Embargoed Content Notice: The content of this clinical practice guideline has been approved by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) board of directors. As a date for publication in Pediatrics has not been set, the clinical practice guideline and associated written materials are embargoed. Therefore, the contents of this presentation cannot be duplicated or shared.



    Members of the multidisciplinary guideline committee (general pediatrics, hospital pediatrics, pediatrics emergency medicine, pediatrics infectious diseases, epidemiology, practice management, family medicine, informatics) will discuss:



    1. Foundational Evidence

    2. Understanding cntext and risk (Primary care, ED, Hospital, ID)

    3. Building consensus through shared decision making

    4. How recommendations should and should not be used

    5 How recommendations will be evaluated

    6. What is on the horizon

    Infectious Diseases

    Hospital-based Medicine

    Epidemiology & Health Services Pathway

    Community Pediatrics

    Health Services Research

    General Pediatrics

  • 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM US CT
    Top Articles in Medical Education 2020: Applying the Current Literature to Educational Practice and Scholarship

    Chair: Barrett Fromme, MD, MHPE – University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine

    We expect that our clinicians provide evidence-based care for their patients. Similarly, we should expect that our educators provide evidence- based teaching for their learners. However, navigating the educational literature and interpreting the nomenclature can feel daunting. With impactful, high quality publications ranging across the continuum of undergraduate, graduate, and continuing medical education, in addition to educational innovations being described in specialties beyond pediatrics, it would be useful to have a tailored resource for pediatric educators.
    This session plans to address that need.
    Now in our fourth year presenting this Symposium (fifth year accepted), we will present and synthesize the most relevant and practice-changing articles in medical education from the year 2020. An expert panel of pediatric educators from the APA Education Committee will review the medical education literature using a modified Delphi approach to determine the top 15-16 articles in medical education. These articles will have the highest relevance to the teaching of pediatrics and potential to change teaching and curricular development across the continuum of education. The articles will be grouped into thematic areas that develop through the process (not selected a priori), but attention will be paid to providing a diversity of articles covering all points in the education continuum. Members of the expert panel will present the different thematic areas as "Hot Topics" for this presentation, including areas of controversy and areas for further scholarship. Audience members will be invited to engage with the presenters to discuss the issues.

    Education Pathway

  • 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM US CT
    Impact of the Vulnerable Preterm Heart and Circulation on Adult Cardiovascular Disease

    Chair: Patrick McNamara, MD – University of Iowa

    Survival rates for extremely low birth weight infants have improved dramatically over the past 10-15 years. These advances are likely to be multifactorial and relate to increased appreciation of developmental organ vulnerability, improved understanding of disease mechanisms and contributing factors, enhanced diagnostic precision and therapeutic options. Unfortunately, enhanced survival does not guarantee avoidance of neonatal morbidity or adverse long-term health care outcomes. The traditional focus of outcomes research relates to neurodevelopment and cognitive functioning. Recent evidence highlights the relationship between prematurity and increased risk of adverse cardiopulmonary health during early adulthood, even in healthy and more mature premature infants. Unfortunately, data are limited regarding the relationship of heart function or other cardiovascular illness during the perinatal period and these outcomes. There is a critical need to increase awareness of these adverse health care outcomes and establish research teams to investigate risk factors and develop preventative approaches. In this symposium, we will review the developmental vulnerability of the premature infant; discuss the impact of prematurity of right/left ventricular function and vascular performance in the pulmonary/systemic beds and highlight areas for innovation and future research that may provide mechanistic insight and guide prevention and treatment approaches.

    Pulmonology

    Neonatology

    General Pediatrics

    Cardiology

  • 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM US CT
    On the Basis of Race: Moving Towards Anti-Racism in Pediatrics

    Chair: Benard Dreyer, MD – NYU Grossman School of Medicine

    This session is a presentation by Pediatricians Against Racism and Trauma (PART), a group of more than 80 pediatricians from across the United States trying to fight racism, bias, discrimination and hatred as it impacts children and families. While structural racism and bias exist throughout society, racism is also "baked into" medicine itself, including pediatrics. This session will bring national leaders and experts together to bring the various aspects of racism in medicine and medical education into focus and suggest ways we can move towards being anti-racists in clinical care and medical education. The session will have the following topics: 1. The norm of whiteness in medicine and medical education; 2. Racial-ethnic inequities in clinical care due to implicit and explicit bias; 3. The inappropriate use of race in clinical algorithms or as a risk factor for outcomes, with the implication that race is a genetic biological trait rather than a social construct; 4. The problematic experiences of URiM students and trainees, including bias in grading, low social capital/belonging (isolation), exposure to microaggressions, and having to deal with cultural differences in performance expectations. Finally speakers will bring these issues together with possible solutions to move pediatrics and pediatricians into being anti-racist.

    Trainee Pathway

    Public Health

    Epidemiology & Health Services Pathway

    Education Pathway

    Diversity and Inclusion

    Core Curriculum for Fellows

    Community Pediatrics

    Clinical Bioethics

    Health Services Research

    Health Equity/Social Determinants of Health

    General Pediatrics

    Clinical Research Pathway

    Career Development Pathway

    Advocacy Pathway

  • 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM US CT
    PRO: Hypoglycemia in Critically Ill Children Should Make Everyone Break Out Into a Cold Sweat! CON: Hypoglycemia in Critically Ill Children – Much Ado About Nothing!

    Chair: Vijay Srinivasan, MBBS MD – Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

    Chair: Michael Agus, MD – Boston Children's Hospital

    This pro-con debate will review the problem of hypoglycemia detection andmonitoring in critically ill children admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit with impact on neuro-cognition and other outcomes. There is not quite enough evidence for harm, but the data is mounting. While data from neonates is more convincing for harm from hypoglycemia, the evidence is not so clear in older critically ill children. Recent trials of tight glucose control in this population of critically ill children did not observe any convincing benefits from such a strategy, but all trials uniformly observed variable increase in hypoglycemia rates. More concerningly, many critically ill children may have hypoglycemia even in the absence of tight glucose control and detection is often difficult due to the inability to discern symptoms. However, it remains unclear if hypoglycemia is transient or sustained due to current intermittent sampling methods with implications for detection and impact on outcomes.

    Neonatology

    Quality Improvement/Patient Safety

    Endocrinology

    Critical Care

  • 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM US CT
    Asthma

    Moderator: Ross E. Myers, MD – Case Western Reserve University / Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital

    Moderator: Megan Tschudy, MD, MPH – Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

    Asthma

  • 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM US CT
    Critical Care: Resuscitation and Potpourri

    Moderator: Katja Gist, DO, MSc – University of Colorado

    Moderator: fola odetola, MB ChB, MPH – University of Michigan

    Critical Care

  • 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM US CT
    Environmental Health

    Moderator: Ruth Etzel, MD, PhD – George Washington University

    Moderator: Sandra H. Jee, MD MPH – University of Rochester

    School and Community Health

  • 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM US CT
    Global Neonatal & Children's Health II

    Moderator: Adnan Bhutta, MBBS – University of Maryland

    Moderator: Lewis P. Rubin, MD, MPhil – Georgetown University Medical Center

    Global Neonatal & Children's Health

  • 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM US CT
    Hospital-based Medicine: Trainee Spotlight

    Moderator: Jacqueline M. Walker, MD, MHPE, FAAP – Children's Mercy Kansas City

    Moderator: Michael J. Tchou, MD, MSc – Children's Hospital Colorado and University of Colorado-Denver

    Hospital-based Medicine

  • 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM US CT
    Mental Health

    Moderator: Oriaku A. Kas-Osoka, MD, MEd – UNLV School of Medicine

    Moderator: Mohsen Saidinejad, MD, MS, MBA – Harbor UCLA Medical Center

    Adolescent Medicine

    Mental Health

    Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics

    Cross-Disciplinary Pathway

  • 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM US CT
    Neonatal GI Physiology & NEC

    Moderator: Steven J. McElroy, MD – University of California, Davis

    Moderator: Hala Chaaban, MD – OU Health Sciences Center

    Clinical Research Pathway

    Breastfeeding/Human Milk

    Neonatology

    Basic Science Pathway

    Gastroenterology/Hepatology

  • 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM US CT
    Neonatal-Perinatal Health Care Delivery: Epidemiology/HSR

    Moderator: John Zupancic, MD ScD – Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

    Moderator: Dmitry Dukhovny, MD MPH – Oregon Health & Science University

    Health Equity/Social Determinants of Health

    Neonatology

    Epidemiology & Health Services Pathway

    Health Services Research

  • 3:00 PM – 3:30 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Children's Mercy Kansas City's Steven Olsen, MD
  • 3:00 PM – 3:30 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital's Allison Payne, MD
  • 3:00 PM – 3:30 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital's Anna Maria Hibbs, MD
  • 3:00 PM – 3:30 PM US CT
    Trainee Zone Networking: Why Choose a Career in Pediatric Nephrology? | Presented by ASPN

    Presenter: Abbie R. Bauer, MD MS – Oregon Health and Science University

  • 4:00 PM – 4:30 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital's Allison Payne, MD
  • 4:00 PM – 4:30 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital's Anna Maria Hibbs, MD
  • 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM US CT
    APA Speed Mentoring
    Speed mentoring

    Career Development Pathway

  • 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM US CT
    Child Abuse & Neglect

    Moderator: Robert Sege – Tufts Medical Center

    Moderator: Kirsten Bechtel, MD – Yale School of Medicine

    Mental Health

    Global Neonatal & Children's Health

    Children with Chronic Conditions

    Nephrology

    Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology

  • 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM US CT
    Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics: Other

    Moderator: Nathan J. Blum, MD – The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

    Moderator: Melissa Scala, MD – Stanford University

    Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics

  • 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM US CT
    Health Services Research II

    Moderator: Marina Catallozzi, MD, MSCE – Columbia University Irving Medical Center

    Moderator: Alex R. Kemper, MD, MPH, MS – Nationwide Children's Hospital

  • 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM US CT
    Immunizations/Delivery: Reminders, Hesitancy and Delivery Systems Improvements

    Moderator: Jennifer Duchon, MDCM, MPH – Mount Sinai Medical Center

    Moderator: Paul M. Darden, MD – The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center

    General Pediatrics

    Immunizations/Delivery

  • 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM US CT
    Infectious Diseases: Potpourri

    Moderator: Karen M. Puopolo, MD, PhD – Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

    Moderator: Saul Hymes, MD – Stony Brook Children’s Hospital

  • 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM US CT
    Injury Prevention

    Moderator: Kimberly Randell, MD, MSc – Children's Mercy Kansas City, University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine

    Moderator: Monika Goyal, MD, MSCE – Children's National Hospital

  • 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM US CT
    Neonatal Clinical Trials

    Moderator: Cindy McEvoy, MD, MCR – Oregon Health & Science University

    Moderator: Jonathan L. Slaughter, MD, MPH – Nationwide Children's Hospital/The Ohio State University

    Neonatology

  • 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM US CT
    Neonatal-Perinatal Health Care Delivery: Quality Improvement

    Moderator: Beverly Brozanski, MD – Washington University School of Medicine

    Moderator: Lori Christ, MD – The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

    Quality Improvement/Patient Safety

    Neonatology

  • 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM US CT
    Nephrology: Renal Transplantation

    Moderator: Elizabeth Ingulli, MD – UCSD

    Moderator: Olga Charnaya, MD, MS – Johns Hopkins University

    Nephrology

  • 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM US CT
    Obesity II

    Moderator: Julie R. Ingelfinger, MD – Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School

    Moderator: Ruben E. Quiros Tejeira, MD – University of Nebraska Medical Center

    Well Newborn

    COVID-19

    Public Health

    Obesity

    Neonatology

    Community Pediatrics

    Pediatric Nutrition

    Health Equity/Social Determinants of Health

    General Pediatrics

  • 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM US CT
    Telemedicine/EHR/Medical Informatics: Telehealth

    Moderator: Shari Platt, MD – New York Presbyterian - Weill Cornell Medicine

    Moderator: Kit Simpson, DrPH – MUSC

    Telemedicine/EHR/Medical Informatics

  • 4:30 PM – 7:00 PM US CT
    Aerodigestive Connection in Infants and Children

    Chair: Deborah Neigut, MD – University of Colorado School of Medicine

    Aspiration and reflux cross several disciplines in pediatric care. An understanding of the physiology of swallow and the causes of reflux are important in the care of these children who often present with challenging problems. A multidisciplinary approach has become more important in evaluating and planning treatment strategies for children with chornic health problems related to aspiration and reflux.

    Scholarly Sessions

    Pulmonology

    Neonatology

    Children with Chronic Conditions

    General Pediatrics

    Gastroenterology/Hepatology

    Cross-Disciplinary Pathway

  • 4:30 PM – 7:00 PM US CT
    Cardiopulmonary Issues in the Down Syndrome Population

    Chair: Dunbar Ivy, MD – University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine

    Chair: Clifford Cua – Nationwide Children's Hospital

    This would be a panel presentation of experts discussing the various cardiopulmonary issues that patients wtih Down syndorme (DS) may encounter during their lifetime.

    -Topic 1 - Genetics involved in the development of congenital heart disease (CHD) in the DS population
    -Topic 2 - Possible changing CHD phenotype in the DS population.
    -Topic 3 - Pulmonary hypertension issue in the DS population
    -Topic 4 - Cardiac morbidity and mortality in the DS population
    -Topic 5 - Longterm/adult cardiopulmonary outcomes in the DS population

    Neonatology

    Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics

    Community Pediatrics

    Children with Chronic Conditions

    General Pediatrics

    Cross-Disciplinary Pathway

    Critical Care

    Cardiology

  • 4:30 PM – 7:00 PM US CT
    Demystifying Immune Dysregulation

    Chair: Jay Mehta – University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

    Chair: Laura Ballenger, MD, RhMSUS – Nationwide Children's Hospital

    In recent years, immune dysregulation syndromes have been increasingly recognized as a source of human disease requiring a multi-disciplinary approach to diagnosis and management. These children may present to a variety of pediatric sub-specialists for care, for example for early-onset diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatic disease, and autoimmune cytopenias. This session will highlight a number of aspects of immune dysregulation of interest to the non-rheumatologist and to pediatric trainees in order to provide a shared mental model of what these conditions look like. The first presentation will introduce the concept of autoinflammation, discuss how to make some sense of a truly dizzying number of single-gene diseases, and show how instructive these rare diseases have been in understanding more common symptoms. The second presentation will use a stepwise, case-based approach to give a few examples of how immune dysregulation can hide in numerous pediatric clinics. The third presentation will describe how immune dysregulation syndromes may be inherited and explain how alternative mechanisms of disease, including somatic mosaicism, may lead to immune dysregulation. Finally, the fourth presentation will provide a practical, multi-disciplinary, and replicable approach to the diagnosis and management of these syndromes.

    Hematology/Oncology

    Genomics

    General Pediatrics

    Cross-Disciplinary Pathway

    Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology

  • 4:30 PM – 7:00 PM US CT
    Don’t Panic! How to Incorporate Pharmacogenetic Testing Into the Care of Pediatric Mental Health Disorders

    Chair: Sara Van Driest, MD, PhD – Vanderbilt University Medical Center

    Chair: Sonya Tang Girdwood, MD, PhD – Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

    Personalized medicine is a National Institutes of Health major initiative and focuses on delivering the right treatment to the right patient at the right time instead of a one-size-fits-all approach. Although pediatricians excel at patient-centered care and weight-based dosing, few other data are incorporated into dosing decisions for children. Pharmacogenetics is the study of how the genetic makeup of a person influences the response to drugs and is an essential pillar to advancing personalized medicine. Advances in pharmacogenetic testing have been made in the field of pediatric psychiatry to provide individualized management of common mental health disorders. As the number of children and adolescents who require treatment for mental health is on the rise, general pediatricians are expected to initiate and titrate psychotropic medications. However, many pediatricians have not received formal training on pharmacogenetic testing, and are unaware of the tests available, the indications for testing, the limitations to test interpretation, and how to adjust therapy based on findings. In this panel discussion, attendees will hear from experts on the current state of pharmacogenetic testing in drugs commonly used in pediatric mental health disorders and how to implement testing clinically in their practice. This session will include discussion of each specific topic throughout, as well as broad discussion based on audience questions and/or sample cases from the presentation team.

    Scholarly Sessions

    Mental Health

    Hospital-based Medicine

    Genomics

    Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics

    Community Pediatrics

    Pharmacology

    General Pediatrics

    Adolescent Medicine

  • 4:30 PM – 7:00 PM US CT
    Sepsis and Inflammation: New Insights in the Era of COVID-19

    Chair: Cynthia F. Bearer, MD, PhD – Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital

    With a lack of quality improvement/quality assurance (QI/QA) sessions in most large pediatric nephrology meetings, I thought that this session could highlight and show off some of the impressive QI/QA work being done in different areas of pediatric nephrology. This workshop will focus on QI as an academic pursuit, showing both small and large scale initiatives that have been successful in the area of nephrology QI. ASPN

    COVID-19

    Public Health

    Neonatology

    Infectious Diseases

    Global Neonatal & Children's Health

    Epidemiology & Health Services Pathway

    Basic Science Pathway

    General Pediatrics

    Clinical Research Pathway

    Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology

    Adolescent Medicine

  • 5:00 PM – 7:00 PM US CT
    Health Equity/Social Determinants of Health: Material and Health Disparities

    Moderator: Salathiel R. Kendrick-Allwood, MD – Emory University School of Medicine/Children's Healthcare of Atlanta

    Moderator: Erin Paquette, MD, JD, MBe, HCEC – Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine/Ann & Robert H Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

    Advocacy Pathway

    Well Newborn

    COVID-19

    Public Health

    Neonatology

    Mental Health

    Diversity and Inclusion

    Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics

    Community Pediatrics

    Children with Chronic Conditions

    Pediatric Nutrition

    Immigrant Health

    Health Equity/Social Determinants of Health

    Endocrinology

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Adolescent Medicine: Highlighted e-Posters

    Moderator: Brittany J. Allen, MD – University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health

    Moderator: Stephanie Staras, MSPH PhD – University of Florida/ College of Medicine / Department of Health Outcomes and Biomedical Informatics

    Adolescent Medicine

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Adolescent Medicine: Highlighted e-Posters Live Q&A

    Adolescent Medicine

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Emergency Medicine: Highlighted e-Posters

    Moderator: Alisa McQueen, MD – University of Chicago

    Moderator: Mark Neuman, MD – Boston Children's Hospital

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Emergency Medicine: Highlighted e-Posters Live Q&A

    Emergency Medicine

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    General Pediatrics: Highlighted e-Posters

    Moderator: Latha Chandran, MD,MPH – University of Miami Miller School of Medicine

    Moderator: Wendy Hobson-Rohrer, MD MSPH – University of Utah

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    General Pediatrics: Highlighted e-Posters Live Q&A

    General Pediatrics

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Genomics/Epigenomics: Highlighted e-Posters

    Moderator: F. Sessions Cole, III, MD – Washington University School of Medicine

    Moderator: Deepthi Alapati, MD – Nemours AI duPont Hospital for Children

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Genomics/Epigenomics: Highlighted e-Posters Live Q&A

    Basic Science Pathway

    Genomics

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Global Neonatal & Children's Health: Highlighted e-Posters

    Moderator: Yves Ouellette, MD PhD – Mayo Clinic

    Moderator: Nicholas Ettinger, MD, PhD – Baylor College of Medicine/Texas Children's Hospital

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Global Neonatal & Children's Health: Highlighted e-Posters Live Q&A

    Global Neonatal & Children's Health

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Health Services Research: Highlighted e-Posters

    Moderator: David Keller, MD – University of Colorado School of Medicine/Children's Hospital Colorado

    Moderator: Amanda Montalbano, MD MPH FAAP – Children's Mercy Kansas City

    Public Health

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Health Services Research: Highlighted e-Posters Live Q&A

    Health Services Research

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Injury Prevention: Highlighted e-Posters

    Moderator: Eric W. Fleegler, MD MPH – Boston Children's Hospital

    Moderator: Leticia Manning Ryan, MD MPH – Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Injury Prevention: Highlighted e-Posters Live Q&A

    Injury Prevention

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Neonatal Clinical Trials: Highlighted e-Posters

    Moderator: Sara DeMauro, MD, MSCE – University of Pennsylvania

    Moderator: Erika Fernandez – UCSD

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Neonatal Clinical Trials: Highlighted e-Posters Live Q&A

    Neonatology

    Clinical Research Pathway

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Neonatal General: Highlighted e-Posters

    Moderator: Amir M. Khan, MD – UTHealth, McGovern Medical School

    Moderator: Tara Glenn, MD – Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital/Case Western Reserve University

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Neonatal General: Highlighted e-Posters Live Q&A

    Neonatology

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Neonatal Neurology: Clinical & Child Neurology: Highlighted e-Posters

    Moderator: Christopher Smyser, MD, MSCI – Washington University in St. Louis

    Moderator: Sagori Mukhopadhyay, MD, MMSc – Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, University of Philadelphia

    Neurology

    Neonatology

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Neonatal Neurology: Clinical & Child Neurology: Highlighted e-Posters Live Q&A

    Neonatology

    Neurology

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Neonatal-Perinatal Health Care Delivery: Epidemiology/HSR: Highlighted e-Posters

    Moderator: Erika Edwards, PhD, MPH – Vermont Oxford Network

    Moderator: Margaret Parker, MD, MPH – Boston Medical Center

    Health Equity/Social Determinants of Health

    Neonatology

    Epidemiology & Health Services Pathway

    Health Services Research

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Neonatal-Perinatal Health Care Delivery: Epidemiology/HSR: Highlighted e-Posters Live Q&A

    Neonatology

    Epidemiology & Health Services Pathway

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Neonatal-Perinatal Health Care Delivery: Practices & Procedures: Highlighted e-Posters

    Moderator: Hany Aly, MD, MSHS – Cleveland Clinic Children's Hospital

    Moderator: Naomi T. Laventhal, MD MA FAAP – University of Michigan

    Clinical Research Pathway

    Neonatology

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Neonatal-Perinatal Health Care Delivery: Practices & Procedures: Highlighted e-Posters Live Q&A

    Neonatology

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Neonatal-Perinatal Health Care Delivery: Quality Improvement: Highlighted e-Posters

    Moderator: Leon Dupree Hatch, III, MD MPH – Vanderbilt University Medical Center

    Moderator: Eugenia (Jean) Pallotto, MD, MSCE – Levine Children's Hospital, Atrium Health

    Quality Improvement/Patient Safety

    Neonatology

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Neonatal-Perinatal Health Care Delivery: Quality Improvement: Highlighted e-Posters Live Q&A

    Neonatology

    Quality Improvement/Patient Safety

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Social Media & Technology: Highlighted e-Posters

    Moderator: Jessica Goldstein, MD – Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital

    Moderator: Saul Hymes, MD – Stony Brook Children’s Hospital

    Adolescent Medicine

    COVID-19

    Social Media & Technology

    Public Health

    Mental Health

    Diversity and Inclusion

    Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics

    Community Pediatrics

    School and Community Health

    Health Services Research

    Health Equity/Social Determinants of Health

    General Pediatrics

    Emergency Medicine

    Cross-Disciplinary Pathway

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Social Media & Technology: Highlighted e-Posters Live Q&A

    Social Media & Technology