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Full Schedule

Full Schedule

  • Monday, May 3, 2021
  • 7:00 AM – 9:00 AM US CT
    Neonatology Virtual Breakfast Program
    US Microbiome Survey: widespread deficiencies in the newborn gut microbiome
    Presented by Evolve BioSystems
    Join us for an in-depth discussion with two Pediatric experts who will share newly published research revealing that infant gut dysbiosis is widespread in the U.S. and what this means for your infant patients, including:

    ● Why common conditions: colic, eczema, gassiness, fussiness, and diaper rash are signs of gut dysbiosis in infants
    ● How gut dysbiosis impacts the development of a healthy immune system
    ● How to restore beneficial B. infantis and resolve dysbiosis
    ● The latest peer-reviewed reported outcome data on improved symptoms after feeding activated B. infantis

    Speakers:
    Karl Sylvester, MD, FACS, FAAP
    Professor of Pediatric Surgery
    Associate Dean of Maternal Child Health Research
    Stanford University


    Whitney Casares, MD, MPH, FAAP
    Pediatrician and AAP author
    Pediatric Associates of the Northwest in Portlanda
  • 9:00 AM – 11:00 AM US CT
    APS Presidential Plenary: The New APS - Lingering Lessons

    Cross-Disciplinary Pathway

  • 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM US CT
    Chorioamnionitis and the Neonate: A Placental Conspiracy of Silence

    Chair: Joyce Marie Koenig, MD – Saint Louis University

    Chair: Eleanor Molloy, MB BCh BAO PhD FRCPI – Trinity College, the University of Dublin

    Chorioamnionitis is a pregnancy inflammation that is diagnosed by histologic analysis of the placenta. In its most severe form, chorioamnionitis can induce a fetal inflammatory response. It typically presents with clinical symptoms in the mother or fetus (clinical chorioamnionitis), particularly in term gestations. Conversely, histologic chorioamnionitis (HCA) is often clinically ‘silent’ and closely linked to preterm birth. HCA may contribute to the pathogenesis of neonatal complications (sepsis, brain injury, chronic lung disease, necrotizing enterocolitis). Mounting evidence also suggests that fetal exposure to inflammation could contribute to health issues in later life, including cardiovascular disease, asthma, and cognitive dysfunction. The goal of this Scientific Session is to highlight cutting-edge research focused on the pathogenesis of HCA as well as on the mechanisms that contribute to adverse fetal and neonatal outcomes. The target audience includes clinicians and scientists interested in perinatal outcomes, developmental immunology and/or mechanisms of inflammation.

    Scholarly Sessions

    Pulmonology

    Public Health

    Neonatology

    Mental Health

    Infectious Diseases

    Hospital-based Medicine

    Hematology/Oncology

    Developmental Biology

    Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics

    Children with Chronic Conditions

    Basic Science Pathway

    Neurology

    General Pediatrics

    Cross-Disciplinary Pathway

    Critical Care

    Clinical Research Pathway

    Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology

  • 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM US CT
    Identifying Critical Social Threats in Critically Ill Children: Considerations for Social Determinants of Health Screening in the PICU

    Chair: Erin Paquette, MD, JD, MBe, HCEC – Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine/Ann & Robert H Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

    Critically ill children may be particularly vulnerable to social determinants of health (SDOH) across the continuum of illness. Substandard living conditions may predispose children to higher risk of critical disease; long-standing toxic stress may worsen illness severity; limited family and community infrastructure could hinder recovery and potentiate post-PICU morbidity. The full impact on critical illness and outcomes is poorly understood, as screening has not been widely implemented.

    Universal screening for SDOH in the acute care setting is recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics. Routine screening for social conditions impacting health and disease can be justified under Wilson and Jungner’s criteria including: recognized need, clear screening objectives, a target population, evidence of effectiveness, ability to test, quality assurance, ability to minimize risks, and informed choice. Identifying socially disadvantaged children and families may improve outcomes by 1) mitigating parental stress through resource provision; 2) preventing hospital readmission and 3) decreasing morbidity after discharge by improving access to post-hospital care that meets needs of limited-resource families. Despite potential benefits, screening is not routinely done.

    Several barriers to screening exist. Screening can uncover psychosocial trauma and requires training in trauma informed approaches. Time to screen can be challenging in the busy PICU setting. Clinic and community resources may vary between institutions, and identification of unmet needs with inability to provide resources could lead to unnecessary “labeling” of families. To reduce risk of and improve outcomes from critical illness, these concerns must be balanced against the need to describe the scope of the problem to generate additional resources. Identifying appropriate ways to screen is of critical importance. Using existing tools in emergent settings may be challenging, creating an opportunity for development of additional tools.

    We argue a strengths-based screening approach may be an effective means of identifying needs while also increasing willingness to participate. Strengths-based tools, however, do not exist. This panel will discuss creation, validation and implementation of a strengths-based, resilience-oriented and stakeholder-informed social history screening tool for use in the acute care setting, through multidisciplinary collaboration, including patient and family engagement.

    Scholarly Sessions

    Public Health

    Health Equity/Social Determinants of Health

    Critical Care

    Advocacy Pathway

  • 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM US CT
    Interdisciplinary Insights on Burnout in Pediatrics in the Time of COVID-19

    Chair: Eliana M. Perrin, MD MPH – Duke University

    The COVID-19 pandemic has presented a kind of “double whammy” (Saleh, 2020) for pediatricians, of acute problems on top of longstanding chronic stress. Prior to the pandemic, nearly 1 in 2 general pediatricians was already burned out (Shanafelt et al., 2015). Now, pediatricians are having to balance old challenges with new ones, such as widespread office closures and reduced volume, with some clinics facing drops in patient visits by 60% or more (Gold, 2020). They are also contending with constantly changing work protocols, increased isolation and ostracization from colleagues, peers, and friends, role-juggling and competing work-family demands. Furthermore, earlier shortages of PPE, combined with societal demands for heroism have caused some physicians to feel more like martyrs than heroes, requiring them to make difficult decisions about their safety, and that of loved ones. Academic researchers have also contended with a chaning landscape of what studies are allowed to continue vs. be deferred and many academic pediatricians have pivoted their work to answer key questions of the day rather than the ones they worked so hard to write grants to answer. This panel will explore these and other ways that COVID-19 is affecting pediatrician clinician attendings, residents, and researchers' health and wellbeing during the global pandemic. It will combine a range of perspectives from clinician educators, to private practice, to academic pediatrics, to sociology to consider how practicing pediatricians are experiencing the crisis—and what might be done to help improve that experience.

    Works cited:
    Gold, J. (2020). Pediatric Practices Struggle To Adapt And Survive Amid COVID-19. Retrieved from https://khn.org/news/pediatric-practices-struggle-to-adapt-and-survive-amid-covid-19/
    Saleh, M. (2020). A Double Whammy: The COVID-19 Pandemic and Burnout in Medical Professionals. Retrieved from https://leanforward.hms.harvard.edu/2020/04/09/a-double-whammy-the-covid-19-pandemic-and-burnout-in-medical-professionals/
    Shanafelt, T. D., Hasan, O., Dyrbye, L. N., Sinsky, C., Satele, D., Sloan, J., & West, C. P. (2015). Changes in Burnout and Satisfaction With Work-Life Balance in Physicians and the General US Working Population Between 2011 and 2014. Mayo Clinic Proceedings, 90(12), 1600-1613. doi:10.1016/j.mayocp.2015.08.023

    COVID-19

    Scholarly Sessions

    Public Health

    Mental Health

    Epidemiology & Health Services Pathway

    Education Pathway

    Diversity and Inclusion

    Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics

    Core Curriculum for Fellows

    Community Pediatrics

    Clinical Bioethics

    Children with Chronic Conditions

    Quality Improvement/Patient Safety

    Health Services Research

    Health Equity/Social Determinants of Health

    General Pediatrics

    Cross-Disciplinary Pathway

    Clinical Research Pathway

    Child Abuse & Neglect

    Career Development Pathway

    Advocacy Pathway

    Academic and Research Skills

  • 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM US CT
    Onco-Nephrology: Surviving the Cancer and Protecting the Beans

    Chair: Rulan Parekh, MD, MS, FRCPC – The Hospital for Sick Children

    Chair: Michelle Denburg, MD, MSCE – The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

    This session will discuss the interface between nephrology and oncology in pediatrics. Topics will include acute complications and late effects of treatments for childhood cancer, including chemotherapy, radiation, bone marrow transplant as well as targeted and immune-therapies. This session will also address malignancy complicating pediatric kidney transplant. Emphasis will be on recent evidence.

    Hospital-based Medicine

    Hematology/Oncology

    Community Pediatrics

    Children with Chronic Conditions

    Nephrology

    General Pediatrics

    Cross-Disciplinary Pathway

    Critical Care

  • 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM US CT
    Vaccine Hesitancy: A Communicable Condition Spreading Around the World

    Chair: Paul Offit, MD – The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

    Chair: Nobuhiko Okabe, MD PhD – Kawasaki Institute for Public Health

    Contact Person: Hiroyuki Moriuchi, MD, PhD – Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences

    In 2019, the WHO has named vaccine hesitancy as one of the top 10 threats to global health. Vaccine
    hesitancy is complex and context specific across time, place and vaccines; however, it is a
    communicable condition spreading around the world through the internet. This session takes up three
    representative problems: MMR vaccine in the Western countries, HPV vaccine in Japan, and dengue
    virus vaccine in the Philippines. Understanding why there is a tendency to hesitate those vaccines
    may lead to the solutions of problems. Moreover, the session introduces some enlightening activities,
    including a joint project of AAP and Japan Pediatric Society.

    Public Health

    Infectious Diseases

    Global Neonatal & Children's Health

    Immunizations/Delivery

    General Pediatrics

  • 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM US CT
    Children with Chronic Conditions I

    Moderator: Matthew H. Shapiro, MD – Ann and Robert H Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

    Moderator: Kristina Malik, MD – Children's Hospital Colorado

    Cross-Disciplinary Pathway

    Children with Chronic Conditions

    Health Services Research

    Health Equity/Social Determinants of Health

    General Pediatrics

  • 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM US CT
    Emergency Medicine I

    Moderator: Aaron Donoghue, MD, MSCE – Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

    Moderator: Lauren S. Chernick, MD MSc – Columbia University

  • 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM US CT
    General Pediatrics: Potpourri II

    Moderator: Esther K. Chung, MD, MPH – University of Washington

    Moderator: H. Shonna Yin, MD, MS – NYU School of Medicine

    General Pediatrics

  • 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM US CT
    Neonatal Cardiac Physiology/Pathophysiology

    Moderator: Shahab Noori, MD, MS CBTI – Children's Hospital Los Angeles, USC

    Moderator: Stephanie Ford, MD – UH Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital

    Cardiology

    Neonatology

  • 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM US CT
    Neonatal Infectious Diseases/Immunology: Neonatal Sepsis

    Moderator: De-Ann M. Pillers, MDPhD – University of Illinois, Chicago

    Moderator: Julia Johnson, MD, PhD – Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

    Clinical Research Pathway

    COVID-19

    Scholarly Sessions

    Neonatology

    Infectious Diseases

    Basic Science Pathway

  • 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM US CT
    Quality Improvement/Patient Safety: Hospital-based QI - Neonatal

    Moderator: Kathleen Gibbs, MD – Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

    Moderator: Margaret Parker, MD, MPH – Boston Medical Center

    Quality Improvement/Patient Safety

    Neonatology

    Hospital-based Medicine

  • 11:00 AM – 11:30 AM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Keriton's Eddie Chang, MD, MBA
  • 11:00 AM – 11:30 AM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital's Marlene Miller, MD, MSc
  • 11:00 AM – 11:30 AM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Vanderbilt University Medical Center Department of Pediatrics' Kristen Noble, MD, PhD
  • 11:00 AM – 11:30 AM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Vanderbilt University Medical Center Department of Pediatrics' Uchenna E. Anani, MD, FAAP
  • 11:00 AM – 11:30 AM US CT
    Trainee Zone Meet the Doctors: Jon-Ryan Burris, MD and Nicole Cifra Gancayco, MD | Presented by the University of Rochester/Golisano Children's Hospital

    Presenter: Jonathan R. Burris, MD – University of Rochester Medical Center

    Presenter: Nicole Cifra, MD, MPH – University of Rochester Medical Center

  • 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: C.S. Mott Children's Hospital, University of Michigan Health's Karl Desch, M.D.
  • 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: C.S. Mott Children's Hospital, University of Michigan Health's Kimberly Levitt, M.D.
  • 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: C.S. Mott Children's Hospital, University of Michigan Health's Rebecca Lombel, M.D.
  • 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: C.S. Mott Children's Hospital, University of Michigan Health's Rob Simsick
  • 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Children's Wisconsin/Medical College of Wisconsin's Karen Marcdante, MD
  • 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Children's Wisconsin/Medical College of Wisconsin's Vanessa McFadden, MD, PhD
  • 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital's Charles Macias, MD, MPH
  • 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital's Marlene Miller, MD, MSc
  • 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: University of Rochester/Golisano Children's Hospital's Bridget Young, PhD
  • 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: University of Rochester/Golisano Children's Hospital's Elizabeth Murray, DO, MBA
  • 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Vanderbilt University Medical Center Department of Pediatrics' Uchenna E. Anani, MD, FAAP
  • 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Vanderbilt University Medical Center Department of Pediatrics' William O. Cooper, MD, MPH
  • 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM US CT
    APS Plenary Series: APS Issue of the Year: Racism and Social Determinants of Child Health

    Cross-Disciplinary Pathway

  • 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM US CT
    Bots for Tots: Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning in Pediatric Biomedical Research

    Chair: Judith W. Dexheimer, MS, PhD, MBA – Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

    Applied machine learning and artificial intelligence continue to invade modern life, driving everything from advertising to automobiles. Big Data are increasingly being used for both research and clinical care. Despite the increase of machine learning applications in both these fields, there remains minimal work being done specifically in pediatrics, which presents a unique environment compared to adult care. Thankfully, pediatricians hold a unique understanding of brain development, which helps provide a baseline for understanding the machine learning concepts modeled after the human brain. At this critical point in informatics research and application, pediatricians must develop a conceptual model of machine learning techniques, identify acceptable use of artificial intelligence methods in medicine, and provide examples of state-of-the-art projects being done to help provide the best possible care for their patients.

    Dr. Dufendach is a neonatologist, assistant professor, and informaticist at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. He will provide a complete primer on machine learning and artificial intelligence from the pediatrics perspective, leveraging the clinician’s conceptual model of brain development to help explain how a neural network works. He will introduce and illustrate the seven steps for developing machine learning algorithms using tangible examples.

    Dr. Dexheimer is a biomedical informaticist with a focus in machine learning and decision support, and associate professor at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. She will highlight research being performed at Cincinnati Children’s. She will discuss the role and impact of AI and ML in research with the electronic health records, explore unique aspects of conducting work in pediatrics with biomedical informatics, and discuss the integration of ML into clinical care.

    Dr. Kirkendall is the Deputy Director, Center for Healthcare Innovation & Director of Digital Health Innovation at Wake Forest Baptist Health. He will discuss the integration of ML and Natural Language Processing into clinical care and the challenges associated with doing so. He will also highlight research using artificial intelligence being performed at both Cincinnati Children's Hospital and Wake Forest Medical Center.

    Dr. Grundmeier is a pediatrician and the Director of Clinical Informatics at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. He is a national expert in the repurposing of clinical data for secondary use in clinical and genomics research. He will provide a broad review of the pediatric-related machine-learning literature and put it into context for the pediatric provider and will highlight state of the art work currently being performed at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.

    Telemedicine/EHR/Medical Informatics

    Clinical Research Pathway

    Academic and Research Skills

  • 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM US CT
    Controversies in the Diagnosis and Management of Urinary Tract Infection in Infants < 2 Months Old

    Chair: Marie Wang, MD, MPH – Stanford University

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common bacterial infections in infants, and occurs in up to 10% of febrile infants <2 months old. Young febrile infants with UTI are commonly encountered in outpatient and inpatient settings and across specialties such as general pediatrics, emergency medicine, hospital medicine, neonatology, and infectious diseases. Current AAP UTI Guidelines address diagnosis and management for 2-24 month olds but do not provide guidance for infants younger than 2 months of age. Consequently, there is uncertainty and variability in diagnosis and management of UTI in the <2 month age group. This session will use case vignettes to provide an engaging review of the latest evidence and multidisciplinary discussion of the following topics: 1) Different definitions of UTI and the role of colony count, urinalysis results and collection method, 2) Routine vs. targeted lumbar puncture in infants with a positive urinalysis, 3) Duration of parenteral therapy for UTI with and without bacteremia, and 4) Imaging following first febrile UTI.



    A panel of experts on urinary tract infection in febrile young infants representing diverse fields (general pediatrics, hospital medicine, emergency medicine, and infectious diseases) will discuss these topics in a moderated format. The session will begin with a brief review of the AAP UTI Guidelines and reasons for special considerations in the <2 month age group. Each topic will begin with a case vignette with audience response polling to assess current practice related to that topic. A focused review of relevant pediatric literature will be provided, followed by a moderated panel discussion to discuss various perspectives. There will be 19 minutes allotted for each topic (12 min presentation followed by 7 minutes of discussion and audience question-and-answer session). Audience members will be able to submit questions through the PAS virtual presentation platform. The moderator will select from the audience questions and facilitate the question-and-answer session per topic, allowing for a total of 28 minutes of attendee-driven discussion to promote in-depth conversations about current controversies. The session will conclude with an overview of future directions for research. Attendees will gain a strong evidence base from which to manage UTI in the <2 month population.



    Outline:

    1. Overview of AAP UTI Guidelines and Special Considerations for <2 month old infants (10 min)

    2. Defining a “Gold Standard” for UTI Diagnosis: Role of the Urinalysis, Urine Culture, and Method of Collection (19 min)

    3. Routine vs. Selective Lumbar Puncture in Infants with a Positive Urinalysis (19 min)

    4. Duration of Parenteral Antibiotic Therapy and Outcomes (19 min)

    5. Routine Imaging Following First Febrile UTI (19 min)

    6. Future Directions (4 min)

    Neonatology

    Infectious Diseases

    Hospital-based Medicine

    General Pediatrics

    Emergency Medicine

  • 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM US CT
    Global Health State-of-the-Art Update Part 1: Direct and Indirect Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic on the Health of Children and Adolescents in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: Solutions and Research Priorities

    Chair: Zulfiqar A. Bhutta, MBBS, PhD – The Hospital for Sick Children

    Chair: Suzinne Pak-Gorstein, MD PhD MPH – University of Washington

    The coronavirus pandemic threatens low and middle-income countries (LMICs) raising great concern about the direct as well as indirect impact of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) on the health and well-being of children and adolescents. Children in LMICs constitute a high proportion of the population and may have a high prevalence of risk factors for severe lower respiratory infection such as HIV or malnutrition. Not only is their physical health impacted by COVID-19, but their countries’ economies and capacity of existing health systems to manage the additional burden are compromised. Further challenges in LMICs include the inability to implement effective public health measures such as social distancing, hand hygiene, timely identification of infected people with self-isolation, and universal use of masks. Finally, significant indirect effects of the pandemic on child health are of considerable concern, including increasing poverty levels, disrupted schooling, lack of access to school feeding schemes, reduced access to health facilities. and interruptions in vaccination and other child health programs.

    In this panel, international experts will describe global, country, and local responses to these challenges including community partnerships, stakeholder coalitions, and innovations. Speakers will also outline research priorities and key calls to action for the international community.

    COVID-19

    Public Health

    Global Neonatal & Children's Health

    Immigrant Health

    Health Equity/Social Determinants of Health

    Cross-Disciplinary Pathway

    Adolescent Medicine

  • 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM US CT
    Management of Post-Hemorrhagic Ventricular Dilatation in the Preterm Infant

    Chair: Terrie Inder, MBChB, MD – Brigham and Women's Hospital

    Chair: Mohamed El-Dib, MD – Brigham and Women's Hospital

    Progressive post-hemorrhagic ventricular dilatation (PHVD) affects more than half of extremely premature infants with severe intraventricular hemorrhage and contributes to their high risk for adverse motor and cognitive neurodevelopmental outcomes. Despite being investigated for many decades, there is no agreement among neonatologists, pediatric neurologists, and neurosurgeons as to the best management approach to PHVD. Very recently, the ELVIS study (Randomized Controlled Early versus Late Ventricular Intervention Study) demonstrated improved 2- year outcome in the early intervention group.

    This hot topic symposium will be led by experts in the field who will elaborate on the following aspects:

    - Pathophysiology and neuropathology of PHVD- Terrie Inder
    - Intervention studies for PHVD- Linda de Vries
    - Surgical interventions for PHVD- David Limbrick
    - Future directions and other neuroprotectors- Praveen Ballabh
    - Consensus approach for evaluating and managing PHVD- Mohamed El-Dib

    This will be followed by panel Q&A allowing for audience interaction.

    Neonatology

    Neurology

  • 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM US CT
    Medical Education Dogmas: Things Educators Do for No Reason

    Chair: Jimmy Beck, MD, MEd – Seattle Children's Hospital

    Webster’s Dictionary defines a “dogma” as a settled opinion, principle, or maxim. When concepts become rigid dogmas, creative thinking is obstructed. This further impedes the development and incorporation of innovative approaches and ideas. Increasingly, attention has been given to clinical practices or “dogmas” that may not be evidence-based. This investigative approach to widely held clinical practices has been promoted through the lauded Choosing Wisely campaign and the “Things We Do For No Reason” series in the Journal of Hospital Medicine. Yet, within education, much like the clinical realm, we have adopted certain widely accepted educational strategies and practices that are potentially futile, or even harmful, for educators and learners rather than being evidence-based or even “best practice”.

    During our session, we will review well-known educational approaches that have become common parts of educators’ teaching toolboxes but that have little evidence to support them and provide little educational value to our learners. These topics, which will be relevant to educators who work with learners of varying levels and in a variety of settings will include: millennial learners, cognitive biases, learning styles, time-based training and simulation based training.

    The session will begin with a brief history of dogmas in general. Then, each panelist will present one medical education dogma that lacks robust evidence for 15 minutes which will include at least 5 minutes of audience participation (Q/A, reflection questions, polling questions) Panelists will also share alternative evidence-based teaching practices that audience members can use in place of the dogma. Finally, we will solicit from audience members other widespread teaching practices that are difficult to justify based on current evidence. Our goal is for this session to assist educators in realizing that not all educational approaches, including “best practices,” have evidence. We hope this session will serve as a starting place for increased research, further investigation into the suggested dogmas and active discussions amongst educators.

    Hospital-based Medicine

    Education Pathway

  • 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM US CT
    Mitigating Gender Inequity in Academic Pediatrics

    Chair: Erin Shaughnessy, MD MSHCM – The University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine

    This diverse panel will summarize known inequities facing women in academic pediatrics, including gaps in compensation, professional opportunities, and academic promotion. Panelists will explore how the current COVID-19 pandemic is exacerbating inequities, and discuss additional barriers faced by women of color. With the problem thus framed, panelists will propose strategies to mitigate gender inequities at the institutional, journal, and societal level. The essential role of male allies will be explored. Audience members will have an opportunity to interact and ask questions via live chat. Participants should leave this session armed with knowledge about the structural and social causes of gender inequity, as well as strategies to address it in their own professional environments.

    Hospital-based Medicine

    Diversity and Inclusion

    Leadership and Business Training

    Health Equity/Social Determinants of Health

    General Pediatrics

  • 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM US CT
    Clinical Videorecording During Resuscitative Care: Applications for Quality Improvement, Care Optimization, and Education and Skill Maintenance

    Chair: Aaron Donoghue, MD, MSCE – Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania


    Resuscitation of critically ill children presents unique challenges to both pediatric and general acute care providers. Resuscitation team members are drawn from a large pool of health care providers (HCP) with highly variable skill and experience levels. These teams are often required to perform resuscitations with limited information on underlying patient morbidity or physiologic risk factors, at any time of day or night, and with minimal advanced warning. Such fundamental procedures as cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and tracheal intubation (TI) are universally required but infrequently performed. The high acuity, low frequency nature of these events make it difficult for the individual health care provider, and by extension, the resuscitation team, to maintain clinical competency and to provide optimal resuscitation to those children who are critically ill.

    The use of videorecording during clinical care has robust history in trauma resuscitation and care of the newly born infant in the delivery room. Over the past decade, a growing body of literature has demonstrated the usefulness of video review as a needs assessment, a quality improvement tool, and a data source for research in pediatric resuscitation. Video review provides clear, unbiased data on these uncommon and highly dynamic patient encounters and can yield elusive information about clinical care, teamwork, communication, and provider interactions.

    In this presentation, we explore the use of clinical videorecording and several applications to assessing and improving resuscitative care. All presenting authors work in academic pediatric centers and have independently, and jointly, led efforts to improve both the care of critically ill patients in the PED and PICU and the training and education of the HCPs who provide this care. Topics covered in this presentation will include: 1) the use of video review as a novel methodology for teaching both CPR performance and ETI skills, 2) application of Crew Resource Management methods for improving resuscitation team leadership and communication, 3) development and implementation of high frequency, on-shift, in-situ simulation programs, and 4) the use of safety checklists to decrease systems variability and cognitive workload during resuscitations.

    Neonatology

    Hospital-based Medicine

    Education Pathway

    Quality Improvement/Patient Safety

    Emergency Medicine

    Critical Care

  • 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM US CT
    Early Childhood Respiratory Morbidity Associated With Preterm Birth

    Chair: Paul Moore, MD – Vanderbilt University Medical Center

    Chair: Rita M. Ryan, MD – Case Western Reserve University

    Bronchpulmonary dysplasia (BPD) has been used for over 30 years as a predictor of early respiratory morbidity, but increased survival of extremely low gestational age newborns (ELGANs) and changes in NICU practice have resulted in limitations to BPD as a predictive value. The Premature Respiratory Outcomes Program (PROP) and Trial of Late Surfactant for Prevention of BPD (TOLSURF) Study are NIH-funded longitudinal birth cohorts of ELGANs that have provided a wealth of clinical, biochemical, and genetic data to study the association of preterm birth with respiratory morbidity. This session hopes to provide clinicians from Neonatology, General Pediatrics, and Pulmonology with an update on predictors of respiratory morbidity in preterm children.

    Asthma

    Pulmonology

    Neonatology

    Children with Chronic Conditions

    General Pediatrics

    Cross-Disciplinary Pathway

    Clinical Research Pathway

    Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology

  • 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM US CT
    Integrating Palliative Care Into Pediatric Nephrology Practice

    Chair: Sarah J. Swartz, MD – Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children's Hospital

    Chair: Aaron Wightman, MD MA – University Of Washington School of Medicine

    Advanced chronic kidney disease is a treatable, but life-limiting and incurable process characterized by significant burdens for the patient, family, and even clinicians. Recognition of the importance of palliative interventions to minimize these burdens has increased dramatically in recent years in adult dialysis patients and other pediatric populations, and palliative care consultation is now included in standard recommendations such as the RPA guideline on shared decision-making in dialysis. Despite this, pediatric nephrology has had a relative dearth of scholarship in palliative care. This symposium will unite experts in palliative medicine and nephrology to disseminate expertise in symptom management, communication, compassionate conservative care, and provider moral distress and burnout in order to empower pediatric nephrologists to take an increased role providing primary palliative care to their patients and propose new avenues of collaboration and scholarship between pediatric nephrology and palliative care.

    Neonatology

    Clinical Bioethics

    Nephrology

    Adolescent Medicine

  • 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM US CT
    Protecting Children From Firearm Injuries: A Continuum of Legislative Advocacy

    Chair: Alexander H. Hogan, MD, MS – Connecticut Children's Medical Center

    Chair: Alyssa H. Silver, MD – Children's Hospital at Montefiore, Albert Einstein College of Medicine

    This video is unavailable at the request of one or more presenters.
    One third of United States children live in a home with a gun. Easy access to firearms leads to hundreds of intentional and unintentional pediatric deaths annually and has resulted in the United States being the world leader in pediatric firearm mortality. As the death toll mounts, and mass shootings become sadly commonplace, a groundswell of activism to change gun laws led by grassroots groups has erupted. Unfortunately, policies advocated for rarely have a strong evidence base as research into the causes and solutions to gun violence have been hamstrung by federal policy. Gun violence is a public health crisis finally beginning to get the attention it deserves.



    The response to this crisis has been multifaceted. Parents and children directly affected by mass shootings have founded and championed grassroots movements to change gun culture and legislative policy. Physician scientists have begun to determine the efficacy of legislative policy reducing firearm morbidity and mortality to inform the legislators on Capitol Hill to reduce pediatric morality. This cross-disciplinary plenary will address how patient advocates, researchers, and legislators can work together to enact evidenced based legislation to keep children out of the line of fire.



    The plenary speakers will consist of 1) a gun violence survivor 2) a health services researcher expert in firearm legislation efficacy, 3) a leader of a grassroots firearm violence reduction group, and 4) a US Senator expert in firearm legislation.



    Timing: 90 minutes total

    5 min: Drs. Hogan and Silver--Introduction

    15 min: Julvonnia McDowell--Mother of child killed by an unsecured firearm

    20 min: Rebecca Cunningham, MD--Vice President of Research at the University of Michigan, Principle Investigator of the Firearm Safety Among Children and Teens Consortium.

    20 min: Shannon Watts (Invited)--Founder of Moms Demand Action the largest grassroots organization in the United States dedicated to reducing gun violence.

    20 min: The Honorable Christopher Murphy, United States Senate (Invited)--Senator Murphy is leading voice in the United States Senate for firearm legislation. He has sponsored numerous bills supporting gun violence reduction strategies, increasing funding for the CDC and NIH, and this year published a new book on the gun violence epidemic: The Violence Inside Us: A Brief History of an Ongoing American Tragedy.

    10 min: Drs. Hogan and Silver moderating--Question and answer session

    Public Health

    Injury Prevention

    Hospital-based Medicine

    Cross-Disciplinary Pathway

    Advocacy Pathway

  • 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM US CT
    Taking the Next Steps in Transgender Care: Clinical Challenges and Research Gaps

    Chair: Katherine B. Greenberg, MD – University of Rochester Medical Center

    Chair: David R. Weber, MD, MSCE – The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

    This multi‐disciplinary session will focus on clinical and research gaps in caring for transgender youth undergoing gender affirming therapy. Specific topics will include mental health, statural growth, fertility, and cardiometabolic health. Presenters will summarize the current gaps in knowledge, provide practical,considerations for clinical care, and identify critical areas for future research.

    Trainee Pathway

    Mental Health

    Endocrinology

    Cross-Disciplinary Pathway

    Clinical Research Pathway

    Cardiology

    Adolescent Medicine

  • 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM US CT
    Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics: Equity/Disparities

    Moderator: Benard Dreyer, MD – NYU Grossman School of Medicine

    Moderator: Salathiel R. Kendrick-Allwood, MD – Emory University School of Medicine/Children's Healthcare of Atlanta

    Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics

  • 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM US CT
    Hospital-based Medicine: COVID

    Moderator: Nicole E. Webb, MD – Valley Children's Healthcare

    Moderator: Alexander F. Glick, MD, MS – NYU Langone Health

    Hospital-based Medicine

    COVID-19

  • 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM US CT
    Neonatal Fetal Nutrition & Metabolism: Outcomes

    Moderator: Ariel Salas, MD, MSPH – University of Alabama at Birmingham

    Moderator: Amy B. Hair, MD – Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children's Hospital

    Clinical Research Pathway

    Breastfeeding/Human Milk

    Neonatology

    Basic Science Pathway

    Gastroenterology/Hepatology

  • 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM US CT
    Neonatal General: Steroids, SIP, Stress and Sepsis

    Moderator: Richard Martin, MD – Case Western

    Moderator: Eric Eichenwald, MD – Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

  • 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM US CT
    Public Health & Prevention I

    Moderator: Nancy R. Kelly, MD MPH – UT Southwestern

    Moderator: Leticia Manning Ryan, MD MPH – Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

    Public Health

    COVID-19

  • 3:00 PM – 3:30 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Keriton's Eddie Chang, MD, MBA
  • 3:00 PM – 3:30 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital's Lolita McDavid, MD
  • 3:00 PM – 3:30 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital's Michael Dell, MD
  • 3:00 PM – 3:30 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Vanderbilt University Medical Center Department of Pediatrics' Daniel J. Moore, MD, PhD
  • 3:00 PM – 3:30 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Vanderbilt University Medical Center Department of Pediatrics' Derek J. Williams, MD, MPH
  • 3:00 PM – 3:30 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Vanderbilt University Medical Center Department of Pediatrics' Uchenna E. Anani, MD, FAAP
  • 3:00 PM – 3:30 PM US CT
    Trainee Zone Networking: How to find a mentor and ways to make the most of it, Laurie Steiner, MD | Presented by the University of Rochester/Golisano Children's Hospital

    Presenter: Laurie Steiner, MD – University of Rochester

  • 4:00 PM – 4:30 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Keriton's Eddie Chang, MD, MBA
  • 4:00 PM – 4:30 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital's Lolita McDavid, MD
  • 4:00 PM – 4:30 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital's Michael Dell, MD
  • 4:00 PM – 4:30 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Vanderbilt University Medical Center Department of Pediatrics' Daniel J. Moore, MD, PhD
  • 4:00 PM – 4:30 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Vanderbilt University Medical Center Department of Pediatrics' Derek J. Williams, MD, MPH
  • 4:00 PM – 4:30 PM US CT
    Doctors on Call: Vanderbilt University Medical Center Department of Pediatrics' Paul Moore, MD
  • 4:00 PM – 4:30 PM US CT
    Trainee Zone Networking: General Academic Pediatrics: Integrating Advocacy and Public Health | Presented by APA

    Presenter: Esther K. Chung, MD, MPH – University of Washington

  • 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM US CT
    APS Plenary Series: Tackling Challenges of Academic Medicine

    Chair: Steven Abman, MD – University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Center

    Cross-Disciplinary Pathway

  • 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM US CT
    Emergency Medicine II

    Moderator: Michelle D. Stevenson, MD, MS, FAAP – Norton Children's and University of Louisville School of Medicine

    Moderator: robert hickey, MD – Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh

    Emergency Medicine

  • 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM US CT
    Health Equity/Social Determinants of Health: Systems Considerations

    Moderator: Andrew F. Beck, MD, MPH – Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

    Moderator: Sheela Rao, MD, MACM – Children's Hospital Los Angeles

    Advocacy Pathway

    Asthma

    Public Health

    Hospital-based Medicine

    Education Pathway

    Diversity and Inclusion

    Digital Therapeutics Pathway

    Community Pediatrics

    Children with Chronic Conditions

    School and Community Health

    Quality Improvement/Patient Safety

    Health Equity/Social Determinants of Health

    General Pediatrics

    Emergency Medicine

  • 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM US CT
    Neonatal Follow-up

    Moderator: Sara DeMauro, MD, MSCE – University of Pennsylvania

    Moderator: Jane Brumbaugh, MD – Mayo Clinic

  • 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM US CT
    Neonatal Neurology: Basic & Translational II

    Moderator: Susan Cohen, MD – Medical College of Wisconsin

    Moderator: Thomas R. Wood, BM BCh PhD – University of Washington

    Neurology

    Neonatology

  • 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM US CT
    Neonatal Respiratory Assessment/Support/Ventilation

    Moderator: Rangasamy Ramanathan, MBBS, MD. – Keck School of medicine of USC, LAC+USC Medical Center

    Moderator: Santina Zanelli, MD – University of Virginia

  • 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM US CT
    Neonatal-Perinatal Health Care Delivery: Epidemiology/HSR and the Douglas K. Richardson Award

    Moderator: Stephen Patrick, MD, MPH, MS – Vanderbilt University

    Moderator: Henry Lee, MD – Stanford University

    Awards

    Neonatology

    Epidemiology & Health Services Pathway

    Environmental Health

    Health Services Research

    Health Equity/Social Determinants of Health

  • 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM US CT
    Nephrology: Potpourri

    Moderator: Beatrice Goilav, MD – The Children's Hospital at Montefiore, Albert Einstein College of Medicine

    Moderator: Daryl Okamura, MD – Seattle Children's Hospital

    Nephrology

    Basic Science Pathway

  • 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM US CT
    Pediatric Nutrition

    Moderator: Susan Feigelman, MD – University of Maryland School of Medicine

    Moderator: Carol L. Wagner, MD – Medical University of South Carolina

    Pediatric Nutrition

    Gastroenterology/Hepatology

    General Pediatrics

  • 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM US CT
    Quality Improvement/Patient Safety: Hospital-based QI - General II

    Moderator: Vijay Srinivasan, MBBS MD – Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

    Moderator: Sunitha V. Kaiser, MD, MSc – University of California, San Francisco

    Quality Improvement/Patient Safety

    Hospital-based Medicine

  • 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM US CT
    Social Media & Technology

    Moderator: Christopher Carroll, MD, MS – Connecticut Children's Medical Center

    Moderator: Sarah Ditch, MD, FAAP – San Antonio Military Health System

    Adolescent Medicine

    COVID-19

    Social Media & Technology

    Public Health

    Neonatology

    Mental Health

    Epidemiology & Health Services Pathway

    Diversity and Inclusion

    Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics

    Community Pediatrics

    School and Community Health

    Literacy

    Health Services Research

    Health Equity/Social Determinants of Health

    General Pediatrics

    Emergency Medicine

  • 4:30 PM – 7:00 PM US CT
    A Multipronged Approach to Addressing Childhood Adversity and Promoting Resilience

    Chair: Binny Chokshi, MD – Childrens National Health System

    The effect of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) on health outcomes across the lifespan is well recognized among pediatric practitioners. Increasing the ability of healthcare providers to recognize and respond to ACEs can buffer the long-term negative physical and mental health impacts of adversity and also increase patient-centered care.

    For pediatric practitioners, there are multiple ways to address ACEs. This symposium will review approaches at the patient, systems (clinic/hospital), community, and education level. It will also highlight the importance of interdisciplinary collaborations in moving this work forward.

    At the patient level, the symposia will review the experience of Atrium Health Levine’s Children’s Hospital, as a pilot site for the National Pediatric Practice Community of the Center for Youth Wellness. Dr. Shivani Mehta will discuss the facilitators and barriers to ACE screening implementation in both the academic and community primary care pediatric settings and review the use of resource referrals as a key intervention in promoting wellbeing and resilience.

    At the clinic and hospital level, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration delineates a framework to guide the creation of trauma-informed systems. Dr. Anita Shah, will review the experience of Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center in developing a trauma-informed strategic plan with multidisciplinary partners.

    Community partnerships can be critical in securing resources to build resilience and preventing childhood adversity. Dr. Nia Bodrick will highlight two exemplary community partnerships, the Early Childhood Innovation Network and the Building Communities Resilience National Coalition.

    Lastly, education on ACEs and trauma-informed care is essential in assuring the sustainability and integration of approaches to confront adversity. Dr. Heather Forkey, will describe the Pediatric Approach to Trauma, Treatment, and Resilience (PATTeR) program, supported by the American Academy of Pediatrics. The PATTeR program has trained over 400 pediatricians and clinic team members about childhood adversity and trauma-informed care.

    The session will begin with a 10-minute introduction on the sciences of adversity and trauma-informed care delivered by Dr. Chokshi. Each of the four speakers will then give a 10-minute talk, followed by 5 minutes of moderated question and answer. This will leave 20 minutes for a interactive group discussion.

    Scholarly Sessions

    Mental Health

    Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics

    Community Pediatrics

    Health Equity/Social Determinants of Health

    General Pediatrics

    Cross-Disciplinary Pathway

    Advocacy Pathway

  • 4:30 PM – 7:00 PM US CT
    Creating and Sustaining Faculty Developmental Networks: Mentoring Models That Work

    Chair: Elaine Schulte, MD, MPH – Children's Hospital at Montefiore - Einstein College of Medicine

    Given the current epidemic of faculty burnout, many academic health centers are looking for ways to enhance engagement and provide faculty development. Fostering interpersonal relationships is one individual factor that has been suggested. Developing support networks allow for a sense of collegiality and connection that is increasingly lacking for many faculty. One model of connection that has been used successfully in the past is the traditional mentor-mentee relationship. In this setting, an older, wiser faculty mentor tells the junior mentee what to do based on his or her own interpretations and expertise. Although beneficial, traditional mentoring has its potential limitations including bias and having the mentee feel unheard. To address these limitations and emphasize the value of a support network as more effective than a singular construct, innovative models of peer mentoring have been designed.

    During this panel discussion, physician directors of five faculty professional development programs will each describe their program. The first program, established in 1995, is a national/international year long, part-time national fellowship program for women across all disciplines of medicine, as well as dentistry, public health, and pharmacy, who are well established in their scholarship, have a leadership position, and are designated by their dean and other institutional leaders as someone with great leadership potential. The second program began in 2009, and is a health system-wide initiative and incorporates the role of a peer coach blended with multiple mentors across domains of interest. The third program housed in a pediatric department began in 2011 and is a blended model that utilizes a skill development curriculum, along with senior faculty facilitation and small group peer mentorship. The next department-wide program was launched in 2014, and is a mixed peer-and-senior multidisciplinary model that emphasizes group discussion on practical concepts. The final program was established inside a pediatric deparment in 2017, and uses a peer group model where each group consists of 3 mentees, who receive domain-specific mentorship from one mentor and oversight by one coach. All five programs have had sustained success and their various program outcomes will be presented. Audience members will have an opportunity to comment and ask questions following each presentation.

    Education Pathway

    Leadership and Business Training

    Career Development Pathway

  • 4:30 PM – 7:00 PM US CT
    Dangerous Drug Epidemic: Opioids, Vaping, and Cannabis

    Chair: Janelle Vaughns, MD – Childrens National Health System

    Chair: Sonya Tang Girdwood, MD, PhD – Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center


    The dangers of opioid, vaping and cannabis consumption are ever present within the pediatric community. Current U.S. trends related to these substances reveal an alarming dependence and abuse potential for these drugs with lethal consequences. This session will consider and present: 1) the current status of the opioid crisis across pediatric population groups specifically focusing upon new and innovative technology that is able to detect drug withdrawal in neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) and analgesia, diversion or recreational use in children and adolescents; 2) describe the natural history of current use and disposition of medical cannabis products and understand the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics of these products in pediatrics; 3) provide up-to-date regulatory data and information from the Food and Drug Administrative (FDA) concerning the agency’s actions and recommendations for the public regarding Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems (ENDS) including vaporizers and e-cigarettes and 4) describe the health risks associated with the use of vaping, an evolving epidemic in children and adolescents. Session speakers are recognized experts in their respective fields, including academia and the FDA. The session will include an interactive panel discussion, designed to facilitate discussion of high-impact clinical questions and strategies with potential for multi-institutional collaboration. At the conclusion of this session, learners may participate in a discussion of research priorities, collaborative opportunities, and strategies for clinical implementation of the information presented in the symposium

    Scholarly Sessions

    Public Health

    Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics

    Pharmacology

    General Pediatrics

    Clinical Research Pathway

    Adolescent Medicine

    Academic and Research Skills

  • 4:30 PM – 7:00 PM US CT
    Probiotics in Pediatrics: Risks vs. Potential Benefits in 2021 – What You Need to Know

    Chair: Gregory Priebe, MD – Boston Children's Hospital

    Chair: Patricia Hibberd, MD, PhD – Boston University School of Public Health

    Probiotics are increasingly used in pediatrics, spanning outpatient general pediatric practice, the emergency department, and hospitalized patients, including those in intensive care units​. Although some studies have shown efficacy in acute infectious diarrhea, antibiotic-associated diarrhea, viral respiratory tract infections, and inflammatory bowel disease, reported benefits are typically probiotic-formulation-specific, and recent clinical trials have raised questions about the potential benefits. Recent data also highlight the risks of bacteremia and sepsis related to probiotics as well as the impact of probiotics on the microbiome. This session will provide an overview of probiotic use and clinical trials in pediatrics, including what is known about probiotics in COVID-19.

    Neonatology

    Infectious Diseases

    Hospital-based Medicine

    Emergency Medicine

    Critical Care

  • 5:00 PM – 7:00 PM US CT
    Palliative Care

    Moderator: Brian S. Carter, MD – Children's Mercy Hospital & University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine

    Moderator: Rebecca Benson, MD PhD – University of Iowa

  • 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM US CT
    ASPN Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Committee
  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Asthma: Highlighted e-Posters

    Moderator: Kerry Caperell, MD, MS, MBA – University of Louisville/Norton Healthcare

    Moderator: Christopher Carroll, MD, MS – Connecticut Children's Medical Center

    Asthma

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Asthma: Highlighted e-Posters Live Q&A

    Asthma

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Child Abuse & Neglect: Highlighted e-Posters

    Moderator: Scott Krugman, MD, MS – Sinai Hospital

    Moderator: Sandra Jee, MD MPH – University of Rochester

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Child Abuse & Neglect: Highlighted e-Posters Live Q&A

    Moderator: Sandra H. Jee, MD MPH – University of Rochester

    Moderator: Scott Krugman, MD, MS – Sinai Hospital

    Child Abuse & Neglect

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Children with Chronic Conditions: Highlighted e-Posters

    Moderator: Christian D. Pulcini, MD, MEd, MPH – University of Vermont Medical Center and Children’s Hospital

    Moderator: Alyna Chien, MD MS – Boston Children's Hospital / Harvard Medical School

    Cross-Disciplinary Pathway

    Children with Chronic Conditions

    Health Services Research

    Health Equity/Social Determinants of Health

    General Pediatrics

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Children with Chronic Conditions: Highlighted e-Posters Live Q&A

    Children with Chronic Conditions

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Developmental Biology/Cardiac & Pulmonary Development: Highlighted e-Posters

    Moderator: De-Ann M. Pillers, MDPhD – University of Illinois, Chicago

    Moderator: David McCulley, MD – University of California, San Diego

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Developmental Biology/Cardiac & Pulmonary Development: Highlighted e-Posters Live Q&A

    Developmental Biology

    Pulmonology

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Gastroenterology/Hepatology: Highlighted e-Posters

    Moderator: Elizabeth Jensen, MPH PhD – Wake Forest School of Medicine

    Moderator: Aayush Gabrani, MD – UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Gastroenterology/Hepatology: Highlighted e-Posters Live Q&A

    Gastroenterology/Hepatology

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Mental Health: Highlighted e-Posters

    Moderator: Terrill Bravender, MD MPH – University of Michigan

    Moderator: Ann E. Burke, MD, MBA – Wright State University Boonshoft School of Medicine/Dayton Children's Hospital

    Adolescent Medicine

    Mental Health

    Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics

    Cross-Disciplinary Pathway

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Mental Health: Highlighted e-Posters Live Q&A

    Mental Health

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Neonatal Cardiac Physiology/Pathophysiology: Highlighted e-Posters

    Moderator: Kate Tauber, MD, MA – Albany Medical Center

    Moderator: Ibrahim A. Sammour, MD CHSE – Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine

    Cardiology

    Neonatology

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Neonatal Cardiac Physiology/Pathophysiology: Highlighted e-Posters Live Q&A

    Neonatology

    Cardiology

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Neonatal Follow-up: Highlighted e-Posters

    Moderator: Girija Natarajan, MD – Children's Hospital of Michigan

    Moderator: Kousiki Patra, MD – Rush University Children's Hospital

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Neonatal Follow-up: Highlighted e-Posters Live Q&A

    Neonatology

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Neonatal Neurology: Basic & Translational: Highlighted e-Posters

    Moderator: Camille Fung, MD – University of Utah

    Moderator: Jennifer Burnsed, MD, MS – University of Virginia

    Neurology

    Neonatology

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Neonatal Neurology: Basic & Translational: Highlighted e-Posters Live Q&A

    Neonatology

    Neurology

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Neonatal Pulmonology: Highlighted e-Posters

    Moderator: Roberta Keller, MD – University of California San Francisco

    Moderator: Krithika Lingappan, MD MS PhD – Baylor College of Medicine

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Neonatal Pulmonology: Highlighted e-Posters Live Q&A

    Neonatology

    Pulmonology

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Pediatric Nutrition: Highlighted e-Posters

    Moderator: Alicia Olave-Pichon, MD, MPH – Puerto Rico Women and Children's Hospital

    Moderator: Vijay Srinivasan, MBBS MD – Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Pediatric Nutrition: Highlighted e-Posters Live Q&A

    Pediatric Nutrition

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Public Health & Prevention: Highlighted e-Posters

    Moderator: Elizabeth Cilenti, MD MPH – Medstar Georgetown University Hospital

    Moderator: David Keller, MD – University of Colorado School of Medicine/Children's Hospital Colorado

    Public Health

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Public Health & Prevention: Highlighted e-Posters Live Q&A

    Public Health

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Telemedicine/EHR/Medical Informatics: Highlighted e-Posters

    Moderator: JAWAHAR JAGARAPU, MD – UT SOUTHWS=ESTERN MEDICAL CENTER

    Moderator: Stephen Porter, MD, MPH, MSc – Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

    Telemedicine/EHR/Medical Informatics

  • 6:15 PM – 7:15 PM US CT
    Telemedicine/EHR/Medical Informatics: Highlighted e-Posters Live Q&A

    Telemedicine/EHR/Medical Informatics

  • 6:30 PM – 8:15 PM US CT
    2020/2021 Virtual Howland Gala

    Awards